Fruit meaning

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The definition of a fruit is the mature ovary of a flowering plant that is edible and usually eaten raw.
noun
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Fruits that grow from a single ovary in the plant are a berry.

An example of a fruit from the group Pepo is a pumpkin, gourd, melon and cucumber.

Examples of fruits from the group Hesperidium are lemons, limes, grapefruits and oranges.

Examples of fruits from the True Berry group are gooseberry, currants, eggplant, kiwi and grapes.

noun
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Fruit is defined as the positive result of something done.

An example of fruit is a newborn baby.

noun
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The fertile, often spore-bearing structure of a plant that does not bear seeds.
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A plant crop or product.

The fruits of the earth.

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A fruity aroma or flavor in a wine.
noun
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Result; outcome.

The fruit of their labor.

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Offspring; progeny.
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Any sweet, edible part of a plant that resembles seed-bearing fruit, even if it does not develop from a floral ovary; also used in a technically imprecise sense for some sweet or sweetish vegetables, such as rhubarb, that resemble a true fruit or are used in cookery as if they were a fruit.

Fruit salad is a simple way of making fruits into a dessert.

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An end result, effect, or consequence; advantageous or advantageous result.

His long nights in the office eventually bore fruit when his business boomed and he was given a raise.

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Fruits that have a hardened shell belong to the group Pepo.
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Fruits that have a rind belong to the group called Hesperidium.
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To bear or cause to bear fruit.
verb
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The ripened ovary of a flowering plant that contains the seeds, sometimes fused with other parts of the plant. Fruits can be dry or fleshy. Berries, nuts, grains, pods, and drupes are fruits. &diamf3; Fruits that consist of ripened ovaries alone, such as the tomato and pea pod, are called true fruits. &diamf3; Fruits that consist of ripened ovaries and other parts such as the receptacle or bracts, as in the apple, are called accessory fruits or false fruits.
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(botany) The seed-bearing part of a plant, often edible, colourful/colorful and fragrant, produced from a floral ovary after fertilization.

While cucumber is technically a fruit, one would not usually use it to make jam.

noun
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Offspring from a sexual union.

The litter was the fruit of the union between our whippet and their terrier.

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(colloquial, derogatory, dated) A homosexual or effeminate man.
noun
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To produce fruit.
verb
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(offensive slang) Used as a disparaging term for a gay man.
noun
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To produce or cause to produce fruit.
verb
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Any plant product, as grain, flax, vegetables, etc.
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The edible plant structure of a mature ovary of a flowering plant, usually eaten raw: many fruits which are not sweet, as tomatoes, beans, green peppers, etc., are popularly called vegetables.
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The quality of being fruity; fruitiness.
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The result, product, or consequence of any action.

Fruit of hard work.

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(slang) A male homosexual.
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(archaic) Offspring; young.
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(bot.) The mature ovary of a flowering plant, together with its contents, and any closely connected parts, as the whole peach, pea pod, cucumber, etc.
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Origin of fruit

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin frūctus enjoyment, fruit from past participle of fruī to enjoy

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • (1125–75) Middle English fruit, frut "fruits and vegetables" from Old French fruit, from Latin fructus, a derivative of Latin frui (“to have the benefit of, to use, to enjoy”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrug- (“to make use of, to have enjoyment of”); cognate with Modern German brauchen "to use", English brook "to tolerate". Displaced native Middle English ovet (“fruit”) (from Old English ofett (“fruit”)), Middle English wastum, wastom (“fruit, growth”) (from Old English wæstm (“growth, produce, increase, fruit”)), Middle English blede (“fruit, flower, offspring”) (from Old English blēd (“fruit, flower”)).

    From Wiktionary