False meaning

fôls
Not keeping faith; treacherous.

A false friend.

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Erected temporarily, as for support during construction.
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Resembling but not accurately or properly designated as such.

A false thaw in January; the false dawn peculiar to the tropics.

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Deceiving or meant to deceive; misleading.

A false scent.

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Not properly so named; deceptively resembling.

False jasmine.

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Based on factually incorrect premises: false legislation.
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Not genuine or real.

False teeth; false documents.

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Unwise; imprudent.

Don't make a false move or I'll shoot.

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(computers) Indicating one of two possible values taken by a variable in Boolean logic or a binary device.
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In a treacherous or faithless manner.

Play a person false.

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Not true; in error; incorrect; mistaken.

A false argument.

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Untruthful; lying; dishonest.

A false witness.

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Disloyal; unfaithful.

A false friend.

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Not real; artificial; counterfeit.

False teeth.

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Based on wrong or mistaken ideas.

False pride.

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(mech.) Temporary, nonessential, or added on for protection, disguise, etc.

A false drawer.

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(music) Pitched inaccurately.
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In a false manner.
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Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.

A false witness.

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Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.

A false friend, lover, or subject; false to promises.

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Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.

A false conclusion; a false construction in grammar.

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Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
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(music) Out of tune.
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Not truly; not honestly; falsely.
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False is defined as untrue, misleading or artificial.

A fact that is untrue is an example of a fact that would be described as false.

A suitcase with a hidden compartment in the bottom is an example of a suitcase with a false bottom.

Dentures that you wear after your own teeth fall out are an example of false teeth.

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Contrary to fact or truth.

False tales of bravery.

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Deliberately untrue.

Delivered false testimony under oath.

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Arising from mistaken ideas.

False hopes of writing a successful novel.

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(music) Of incorrect pitch.
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(logic) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
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Intentionally deceptive.

A suitcase with a false bottom; false promises.

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play someone false
  • to deceive, cheat, hoodwink, or betray someone
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put in a false position
  • to cause misunderstanding of the intentions, opinions, etc. of
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

put in a false position

Origin of false

  • Middle English fals from Old English counterfeit, and from Old French false both from Latin falsus from past participle of fallere to deceive

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English false, from Anglo-Norman and Old French fals, faus, from Latin falsus (“counterfeit, false; falsehood”), perfect passive participle of fallō (“deceive”). Compare Old English fals (“wrong, mistaken”), German falsch, Dutch vals, Danish and Swedish falsk, all from Latin falsus. Displaced native Middle English les, lese (“false”), from Old English lēas; See lease, leasing.

    From Wiktionary

  • For spelling, the -e (on -lse) is so the end is pronounced /ls/, rather than /lz/ as in falls, and does not change the vowel (‘a’). Compare else, pulse, convulse.

    From Wiktionary