Pulse meaning

pŭls
The definition of a pulse is a rhythmic beating in the arteries caused by the beating of the heart.

An example of a pulse is the throbbing beat heard at the wrist.

noun
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The rhythmical throbbing of arteries produced by the regular contractions of the heart, especially as palpated at the wrist or in the neck.
noun
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A plant yielding these seeds.
noun
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The edible seeds of peas, beans, lentils, and similar plants having pods.
noun
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To pulsate; beat.
verb
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To cause to pulsate.
verb
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To drive (an engine, etc.) by pulses.
verb
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Any leguminous plant.
noun
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The rhythmical throbbing of arteries produced by the regular contractions of the heart, especially as palpated at the wrist or in the neck.
noun
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Any annual legume yielding from 1 to 12 grains or seeds of variable size, shape and colour within a pod, and used as food for humans or animals.
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The perceptible underlying feelings of the public or of a particular group.
noun
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The perceptible emotions or sentiments of a group of people.
noun
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The edible seeds of certain pod-bearing plants, such as lentils and chickpeas.
noun
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Any beat, signal, vibration, etc. that is regular or rhythmical.
noun
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A variation, characterized by a rise, limited duration, and decline, of a quantity whose value normally is constant.
  • (elec.) A brief surge of voltage or current.
  • (radio) A very short burst of electromagnetic waves.
noun
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To pulsate; throb.
verb
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(elec.) To apply pulses to.
verb
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(radio) To modify (an electromagnetic wave) by means of pulses.
verb
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(physics) To undergo a series of intermittent occurrences characterized by brief, sudden changes in a quantity.
verb
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A dose of a medication or other substance given over a short period of time, usually repetitively.
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A short duration of current flow. The current rises and falls sharply, but not instantaneously. See wave.
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A brief, temporary change in a quantity or value from its normal or initial level for a period of time, and then a decay of that value back to the original level. Purely digital systems that do not rely on the modulation of an underlying carrier fit this definition.Telegraphy, for example, relies on the making and breaking of an electrical current so that the normal or initial level is a current off (no current) condition and the pulse is either a short or long current on (yes current) condition (dot or dash, respectively), separated by a short current off (no current) condition (space). Similarly, digital fiber optic transmission systems (FOTS) operate on the basis of light on (1 bit) and light off (0 bit).
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(physiology) A normally regular beat felt when arteries are depressed, caused by the pumping action of the heart.
noun
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A beat or throb.
noun
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(music) The beat or tactus of a piece of music.
noun
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An autosoliton.
noun
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To beat, to throb, to flash.

In the dead of night, all was still but the pulsing light.

verb
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To flow, particularly of blood.

Hot blood pulses through my veins.

verb
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To emit in discrete quantities.
verb
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(physics) To undergo a series of intermittent occurrences characterized by brief, sudden changes in a quantity.
verb
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The regular beating in the arteries, caused by the contractions of the heart.
noun
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The rhythmic expansion and contraction of the arteries as blood is pumped through them by the heart. The pulse can be felt at several parts of the body, as over the carotid and radial arteries.
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take the pulse of
  • To judge the mood or views of (a political electorate, for example):
    The politician was able to take the pulse of the grass-roots voters.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take the pulse of

Origin of pulse

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin pulsus from past participle of pellere to beat pel-5 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pols, puls from Latin puls pottage of meal and pulse probably ultimately from Greek poltos

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • For spelling, the -e (on -lse) is so the end is pronounced /ls/, rather than /lz/ as in pulls, and does not change the vowel (‘u’). Compare else, false, convulse.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin pulsus (“beat”), from pellere (“to drive”), from Proto-Indo-European *pel (“to drive, strike, thrust”).

    From Wiktionary