Popular meaning

pŏpyə-lər
Widely liked or appreciated.

A popular resort.

adjective
9
2
The definition of popular is widely liked or well known.

An example of something popular is cookie dough ice cream.

adjective
7
2
Of, representing, or carried on by the people at large.

The popular vote.

adjective
7
2
Fit for, adapted to, or reflecting the taste of the people at large.

Popular entertainment; popular science.

adjective
5
1
Liked by acquaintances; sought after for company.
adjective
4
2
Advertisement
Accepted by or prevalent among the people in general.

A popular misunderstanding of the issue.

adjective
1
0
Appealing to or intended for the general public.

Popular music.

adjective
1
0
Suited to or within the means of ordinary people.

Popular prices.

adjective
0
0
Originating among the people.

Popular legend.

adjective
0
0
Of or carried on by the common people or all the people.

Popular government.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Within the means of the ordinary person.

Popular prices.

adjective
0
0
Accepted among people in general; common; prevalent.

A popular notion.

adjective
0
0
Liked by very many or most people.

A popular actor.

adjective
0
0
Very well liked by one's friends and acquaintances.
adjective
0
0
Common among the general public; generally accepted. [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(law) Concerning the people; public. [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
Pertaining to or deriving from the people or general public. [from 16th c.]
adjective
0
0
Aimed at ordinary people, as opposed to specialists etc.; intended for general consumption. [from 16th c.]
adjective
0
0
Liked by many people; generally pleasing, widely admired. [from 17th c.]
adjective
0
0
Adapted to the means of the common people; cheap. [from 19th c.]
adjective
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of popular

  • Middle English populer commonly known from Old French populeir of the people from Latin populāris from populus the people of Etruscan origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin populāris, from populus (“people") + -āris (“-ar").

    From Wiktionary