Vernacular meaning

vər-năkyə-lər
Vernacular is common language spoken by average citizens of a particular place, or is language used within a particular field or industry.

An example of vernacular is English in the US.

An example of vernacular is medical terms used by doctors.

noun
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2
Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
adjective
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Everyday speech or dialect, including colloquialisms, as opposed to literary or liturgical language.

Street vernacular can be quite different from what is heard elsewhere.

noun
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Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
adjective
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Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.
adjective
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Commonly spoken by the people of a particular country or place.

A vernacular, as distinguished from the literary, dialect.

adjective
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1
Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.
adjective
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1
(Roman Catholicism) The indigenous language of a people, into which the words of the Mass are translated.

Vatican II allowed the celebration of the mass in the vernacular.

noun
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1
Using the native language of a country or place.

A vernacular writer.

adjective
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The language of a people, a national language.

The vernacular of the United States is English.

noun
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The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group.

In the legal vernacular.

noun
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Native to a country or region.

The vernacular arts of Brittany.

adjective
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1
Designating or of the common name of an animal or plant, as distinguished from the scientific name in Modern Latin taxonomic classification.
adjective
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The native language or dialect of a country or place.
noun
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The common, everyday language of ordinary people in a particular locality.
noun
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The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
noun
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1
Language unique to a particular group of people; jargon, argot.

For those of a certain age, hiphop vernacular might just as well be a foreign language.

noun
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Of or pertaining to everyday language.
adjective
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1
Belonging to the country of one's birth; one's own by birth or nature; native; indigenous.

A vernacular disease.

adjective
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The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
noun
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Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language.

A vernacular poet.

adjective
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Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
adjective
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Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic.

A vernacular disease.

adjective
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Of or in the native language.
adjective
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The shoptalk or idiom of a profession or trade.
noun
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Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic.

A vernacular disease.

adjective
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Origin of vernacular

  • From Latin vernāculus native from verna native slave perhaps of Etruscan origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin vernāculus (“domestic, indigenous, of or pertaining to home-born slaves"), from verna (“a native, a home-born slave (one born in his master's house)").

    From Wiktionary