Idiom Definition

ĭdē-əm
idioms
noun
idioms
The specific grammatical, syntactic, and structural character of a given language.
American Heritage
The usual way in which the words of a particular language are joined together to express thought.
Webster's New World
A phrase, construction, or expression that is recognized as a unit in the usage of a given language and either differs from the usual syntactic patterns or has a meaning that differs from the literal meaning of its parts taken together (Ex.: not a word did she say; she heard it straight from the horse's mouth)
Webster's New World
The language or dialect of a people, region, class, etc.
Webster's New World
Regional speech or dialect.
American Heritage
Antonyms:
standard
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Other Word Forms of Idiom

Noun

Singular:
idiom
Plural:
idiomata

Origin of Idiom

  • From Middle French idiome, and its source, Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idioma, “a peculiarity, property, a peculiar phraseology, idiom”), from ἰδιοῦσθαι (idiousthai, “to make one's own, appropriate to oneself”), from ἴδιος (idios, “one's own, pertaining to oneself, private, personal, peculiar, separate”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Late Latin idiōma idiōmat- from Greek from idiousthai to make one's own from idios own, personal, private s(w)e- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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idiom