Jargon meaning

järgən
Frequency:
The specialized vocabulary and idioms of those in the same work, profession, etc., as of sportswriters or social workers.
noun
14
2
To speak in or use jargon.
verb
12
2
A language or dialect unknown to one so that it seems incomprehensible or outlandish.
noun
7
0
A mixed or hybrid language or dialect; esp., pidgin.
noun
7
0
Incoherent speech; gibberish.
noun
6
1
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Speech or writing full of long, unfamiliar, or roundabout words or phrases.
noun
3
0
verb
2
0
A colorless or smoky variety of zircon.
noun
2
0
The specialized spoken language of an industry or profession. The high-tech world is naturally loaded with jargon. Contrast with "slang," which refers to words used as alternates to other words or that are used in certain venues only. See syntax.
2
0
(uncountable) A technical terminology unique to a particular subject.
noun
2
0
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(countable) Language characteristic of a particular group.
noun
2
0
(uncountable) Speech or language that is incomprehensible or unintelligible; gibberish.
noun
1
0
To utter jargon; to emit confused or unintelligible sounds.
verb
1
0
A variety of zircon.
noun
1
0
The definition of jargon is the language of a particular trade or group that would be meaningless to others.

An example of jargon is "RBI" to baseball.

noun
1
1
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The specialized language of a trade, profession, or similar group, especially when viewed as difficult to understand by outsiders.

A crime novel that uses a lot of police jargon.

noun
0
1
Nonsensical or incoherent language.
noun
0
1
A hybrid language or dialect; a pidgin. Not in technical use.
noun
0
1

Origin of jargon

  • Middle English jargoun from Old French jargon probably of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French, from Italian giargone, from Persian زر گون (zar gun, “gold-colored”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French jargon (“chatter, talk, language”)

    From Wiktionary