Patter definition

pătər
To move with quick, light, softly audible steps.
verb
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To cause to patter.
verb
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A quick succession of light soft tapping sounds.

The patter of rain on the rooftops.

noun
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To speak or chatter glibly and rapidly.
verb
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To mumble prayers in a mechanical manner.
verb
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To utter in a glib, rapid, or mechanical manner.
verb
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The jargon of a particular group; cant.
noun
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Glib rapid speech, as of an auctioneer, salesperson, or comedian.
noun
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Meaningless talk; chatter.
noun
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To make a patter.
verb
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To run or move along so as to make a patter.
verb
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A series of quick, light taps.

The patter of rain on leaves.

noun
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To speak or mumble rapidly or glibly; recite (prayers, etc.) mechanically or thoughtlessly.
verb
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Language peculiar to a group, class, etc., and not generally understood by outsiders; cant; jargon.
noun
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The glib, rapid speech of salespeople, comedians, magicians, etc.
noun
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Idle, meaningless chatter.
noun
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A person or thing that pats.
noun
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The soft sound of feet walking on a hard surface.

I could hear the patter of mice running about in the dark.

noun
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To make irregularly repeated sounds of low-to-moderate magnitude and lower-than-average pitch.

The bullets pattered into the log-cabin walls.

verb
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verb
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Glib and rapid speech, such as from an auctioneer, or banter during a sports event.
noun
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To speak in such a way - glibly and rapidly, such as from an auctioneer, or when bantering during a sports event.
verb
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One who pats.
noun
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To make a quick succession of light soft tapping sounds.

Rain pattered steadily against the glass.

verb
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
patter
Plural:
patters

Origin of patter

  • Middle English pateren shortening and alteration of paternoster paternoster (from the mechanical and rapid recitation of the prayer) paternoster

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Frequentative of pat

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Circa 1400, from paternoster (“the Lord's prayer"), possibly influenced by imitative sense (above), Latin pater (“father"), from Proto-Indo-European *phâ‚‚tḗr.

    From Wiktionary

  • 1610s, pat +"Ž -er (“frequentative (indicating repeated action)"), of (onomatopoeia) origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • Noun attested 1758, originally referring to the cant of thieves and beggers.

    From Wiktionary

  • pat +"Ž -er (“agent")

    From Wiktionary