Buzzword meaning

bŭzwûrd
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A word or phrase used by members of some in-group, having little or imprecise meaning but sounding impressive to outsiders.
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An stylish or trendy word or phrase, especially when occurring in a specialized field.
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A term that refers to the latest technology or just sounds catchy. Artificial intelligence (AI) is the hot buzzword today. Like all major buzzwords in the past, AI is often overused and abused (see AI).Other buzzwords are blockchain, Bitcoin, IoT and augmented reality. Just a few months ago, cloud, big data and smartwatch were hot topics. A few years ago, social networking, Web 2.0, Twitter, Facebook, smartphone, tablet and green were all the rage. See cloudwashing.In the beginning, everyone uses cutting edge terms to appear knowledgeable (see buzzword compliant). However, if not a flash in the pan, new technologies become mainstream, and the words eventually become everyday vocabulary. See disruptive technology."Nano" This - "Nano" ThatNanotechnology was very popular right after the turn of the century. The "nano" prefix was tacked onto existing manufacturing processes that had already been dealing with microscopic elements for years. Some companies even added "nano" to their corporate name to take advantage of the buzz (see nanotechnology).Old BuzzwordsThe last half of the 1990s brought us numerous Internet buzzwords, including Java, intranet and e-commerce. Early industry buzzwords were client/server in the 1990s, distributed computing in the 1980s and MIS in the 1970s.
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(pejorative) A word drawn from or imitative of technical jargon, and often rendered meaningless and fashionable through abuse by non-technical persons in a seeming show of familiarity with the subject.

Their salespeople know all the right buzzwords, but they can’t really help you solve your problems.

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Origin of buzzword

  • U.S. 1970s from buzz + word

    From Wiktionary