Slang meaning

slăng
Frequency:
Highly informal speech that is outside conventional or standard usage and consists both of coined words and phrases and of new or extended meanings attached to established terms: slang develops from the attempt to find fresh and vigorous, colorful, pungent, or humorous expression, and generally either passes into disuse or comes to have a more formal status.
noun
9
2
The specialized vocabulary and idioms of those in the same work, way of life, etc.
noun
4
1
Language peculiar to a group; argot or jargon.

Thieves' slang.

noun
4
2
To attack with abusive language; vituperate.
verb
4
2
verb
4
7
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(obs.) The specialized vocabulary and idioms as of criminals and tramps, the purpose of which was to disguise from outsiders the meaning of what was said.
noun
3
2
To use slang or abusive talk.
verb
3
2
A kind of language occurring chiefly in casual and playful speech, made up typically of coinages and figures of speech that are deliberately used in place of standard terms for added raciness, humor, irreverence, or other effect.
noun
2
1
(archaic) Simple past tense of sling.
verb
1
0
To use angry and abusive language.

Persuaded the parties to quit slanging and come to the bargaining table.

verb
1
1
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To address with abusive talk.
verb
1
1
To use slang.
verb
1
2
Slang is a casual type of language that is playful and trendy or used by a particular group of people.

An example of slang is saying something good is awesome.

noun
0
0
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0
Language outside of conventional usage.
noun
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0
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Language that is unique to a particular profession or subject; jargon.
noun
0
0
The specialized language of a social group, sometimes used to make what is said unintelligible to those not members of the group; cant.
noun
0
0
(dated) To vocally abuse, or shout at.
verb
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0
(UK, dialect) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.

noun
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(UK, obsolete) A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.
noun
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0
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Origin of slang

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1756, origin unknown.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare sling.

    From Wiktionary