Bring meaning

brĭng
To be sold for.

A portrait that brought a million dollars.

verb
4
2
The definition of bring means to carry or to cause to happen.

An example of to bring is to bake cookies and take them to a friend's house.

An example of to bring is to create life by bringing a baby into the world.

verb
3
0
To carry as an attribute or contribution.

You bring many years of experience to your new post.

verb
3
1
To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location.

Bring the water to a boil; brought the meeting to a close.

verb
3
1
To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place.

Brought enough money with me.

verb
2
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To cause to be, happen, come, appear, have, etc.

War brings death and famine; rest brings one health.

verb
2
0
To lead, persuade, or influence along a course of action or belief.
verb
2
0
To sell for.

Eggs bring a high price today.

verb
2
0
To transport toward somebody/somewhere.

Waiter, please bring me a single malt whiskey.

verb
2
0
(figuratively) To supply or contribute.

The new company director brought a fresh perspective on sales and marketing.

verb
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To raise (a lawsuit, charges, etc.) against somebody.
verb
2
0
(baseball) To pitch, often referring to a particularly hard thrown fastball.

The closer Jones can really bring it.

verb
2
0
The sound of a telephone ringing.
interjection
2
0
To carry or lead (a person or thing) to the place thought of as “here” or to a place where the speaker will be.

Bring it to my house tomorrow.

verb
1
0
To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall.

This music brings back memories.

verb
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To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
verb
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bring down the house
  • To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
idiom
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bring home
  • To make perfectly clear:
    A lecture that brought home several important points.
idiom
0
0
bring home the bacon
  • To earn a living, especially for a family.
  • To achieve desired results; have success.
idiom
0
0
bring to bear
  • To exert; apply:
    Bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
  • To put (something) to good use:
idiom
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bring to light
  • To reveal or disclose:
    Brought the real facts to light.
idiom
0
0
bring to (one's) knees
  • To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
idiom
0
0
bring to terms
  • To force (another) to agree.
idiom
0
0
bring up the rear
  • To be the last in a line or sequence.
idiom
0
0
bring about
  • to make happen; effect
idiom
0
0
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bring around
  • to persuade by arguing, urging, etc.
  • to put or coax into a good humor
  • to bring back to consciousness or health
idiom
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0
bring down
  • to cause to come down or fall
  • to wound or kill
idiom
0
0
bring forth
  • to make known; disclose
idiom
0
0
bring forward
  • to introduce; show
  • to carry over
idiom
0
0
bring in
  • to import
  • to give (a verdict or report)
idiom
0
0
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bring off
  • to succeed in doing; accomplish
idiom
0
0
bring on
  • to cause to be, happen, or appear
idiom
0
0
bring out
  • to reveal; make clear or clearer
  • to bring (a play, person, etc.) before the public, or to publish (a book, magazine, etc.)
  • to introduce (a girl or young woman) formally to society
idiom
0
0
bring over
  • to convince or persuade
idiom
0
0
bring to
  • to revive (an unconscious person)
  • to cause (a ship) to stop
idiom
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bring up
  • to take care of during infancy and childhood by educating, nurturing, training, etc.; raise; rear
  • to introduce, as into discussion
  • to stop abruptly
idiom
0
0

Origin of bring

  • Middle English bringen from Old English bringan bher-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bringen, from Old English bringan (“to bring, lead, bring forth, carry, adduce, produce, present, offer”), from Proto-Germanic *bringaną (“to bring”) (compare West Frisian bringe, Low German bringen, Dutch brengen, German bringen), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrenk (compare Welsh he-brwng (“to bring, lead”), Tocharian B pränk (“to take away; restrain oneself, hold back”), Albanian brengë (“worry, anxiety, concern”), Latvian brankti (“lying close”), Lithuanian branktas (“whiffletree”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • Onomatopeia

    From Wiktionary