Lend meaning

lĕnd
To make a loan.
verb
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To give; impart.

A fire lends cheer to a room.

verb
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To provide something temporarily to another, often in exchange for compensation.
verb
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To make a loan or loans.
verb
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Lend is defined as to give to someone to use or allow someone to borrow.

An example of to lend is for a person to give his car to a friend for the day.

verb
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To let another use or have (a thing) temporarily and on condition that it, or the equivalent, be returned.
verb
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To contribute or impart.

Books and a fireplace lent a feeling of warmth to the room.

verb
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To let out (money) at interest.
verb
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(anatomy, UK dialectal) The lumbar region; loin.
noun
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(UK dialectal) (of a person or animal) The loins; flank; buttocks.
noun
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To allow to be used by someone temporarily, on condition that it or its equivalent will be returned.

I will only lend you my car if you fill up the tank.

I lent her 10 euros to pay for the train tickets, and she paid me back the next day.

verb
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(intransitive) To make a loan.
verb
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(reflexive) To be suitable or applicable, to fit.

Poems do not lend themselves to translation easily.

The long history of the past does not lend itself to a simple black and white interpretation.

verb
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(proscribed) To borrow.
verb
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To make available for another's use.

The neighbors lent us help after the storm.

verb
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lend a hand
  • To be of assistance.
idiom
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lend (itself) to
  • To accommodate or offer itself to; be suitable for:
idiom
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lend itself to
  • to be adapted to, useful for, or open to
idiom
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Origin of lend

  • Middle English lenden alteration of lenen (on the model of such verbs as senden to send) (whose past participle sent rhymed with lent) (past participle of lenen) from Old English lǣnan leikw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From earlier len (with excrescent -d, as in sound, round, etc.), from Middle English lenen, lænen, from Old English lÇ£nan (“to lend; give, grant, lease"), from Proto-Germanic *laihnijanÄ… (“to loan"), from Proto-Germanic *laihnÄ… (“loan"), from Proto-Indo-European *leykÊ·- (“to leave, leave over"). Cognate with Scots len, lend (“to lend"), West Frisian liene (“to lend, borrow, loan"), Dutch lenen (“to lend, borrow, loan"), German lehnen (“to borrow, lend out, loan"), Swedish lÃ¥na (“to lend, loan"), Icelandic lána (“to lend, loan"), Icelandic léna (“to grant"), Latin linquō (“quit, leave, forlet"), Ancient Greek λείπω (léipō, “leave, release"). See also loan.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lende (usually in plural as lendes, leendes, lyndes), from Old English lendenu, lendinu (“loins", plural), from Proto-Germanic *landijō, *landį̄ (“loin"), from Proto-Indo-European *lendÊ°- (“loin, kidney"). Cognate with Scots lend, leynd (“the loins, flank, buttocks"), Dutch lendenen (“loins, reins"), German Lenden (“loins"), Swedish länder (“loins"), Icelandic lendar (“loins"), Latin lumbus (“loin"), Russian лядвея (ljádveja, “thigh, haunch").

    From Wiktionary