Borrow definition

bŏrō, bôrō
To borrow something.
verb
8
1
To obtain or receive (something) on loan with the promise or understanding of returning it or its equivalent.
verb
6
0
(linguistics) To adopt (a word) from one language for use in another.
verb
9
5
To adopt or take over (something) as one's own.

To borrow a theory.

verb
3
0
In subtraction, to take a unit from the next larger denomination in the minuend so as to make a number larger than the number to be subtracted.
verb
2
0
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(proscribed) To lend.
verb
2
0
To adopt or use as one's own.

I borrowed your good idea.

verb
2
1
The definition of borrow means to take or receive something with the intention of giving it back.

A friend bringing a book to someone and that person returning it the following week is an example of to borrow.

verb
1
0
Borrow means to take over something and use it as one's own.

To use an established theory as the basis of a scientific experiment is an example of borrowed.

verb
1
0
(linguistics) To adopt words from one language for use in another.
verb
0
0
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To take or receive (something) with the understanding that one will return it or an equivalent.
verb
0
0
To adopt and naturalize (a word, etc.) from another language.

The word depot was borrowed from French.

verb
0
0
(arith.) In subtraction, to take (a unit of ten) from the next higher place in the minuend and add it to the next lower place: done when the number to be subtracted in the subtrahend is greater than the corresponding number in the minuend.
verb
0
0
To receive (something) from somebody temporarily, expecting to return it.
verb
0
0
To adopt (an idea) as one's own.

To borrow the style, manner, or opinions of another.

verb
0
0
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(linguistics) To adopt a word from another language.
verb
0
0
(arithmetic) In a subtraction, to deduct (one) from a digit of the minuend and add ten to the following digit, in order that the subtraction of a larger digit in the subtrahend from the digit in the minuend to which ten is added gives a positive result.
verb
0
0
(double , US, dialect) To temporarily obtain (something) for (someone).
verb
0
0
To feign or counterfeit.
verb
0
0
(golf) Deviation of the path of a rolling ball from a straight line; slope; slant.

This putt has a big left-to right borrow on it.

noun
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0
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(archaic) A ransom; a pledge or guarantee.
noun
0
0
(archaic) A surety; someone standing bail.
noun
0
0
A surname​.

George Borrow wrote novels and travelogues based on his experiences travelling around Europe.

pronoun
0
0
borrow trouble
  • To take an unnecessary action that will probably engender adverse effects.
idiom
0
0
borrow trouble
  • to worry about anything needlessly or before one has sufficient cause
idiom
0
0
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living on borrowed time
  • living past the likely or usual time of death
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
borrow
Plural:
borrows

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

living on borrowed time

Origin of borrow

  • Middle English borwen from Old English borgian bhergh-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English borwen, borȝien, Old English borgian (“to borrow, lend, pledge surety for”), from Proto-Germanic *burgōną (“to pledge, take care of”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhergh- (“to take care”). Cognate with Dutch borgen (“to borrow, trust”), German borgen (“to borrow, lend”), Danish borge (“to vouch”). Related to Old English beorgan (“to save, preserve”). More at bury.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English borg, from Proto-Germanic (related to Etymology 1, above).

    From Wiktionary