Mooch meaning

mo͝och
To obtain or try to obtain by begging; cadge.
verb
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To get or try to get something free of charge; sponge.

Lived by mooching off friends.

verb
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To wander about aimlessly.
verb
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To skulk around; sneak.
verb
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To steal; filch.
verb
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One who begs or cadges; a sponge.
noun
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A dupe, as in a confidence game.
noun
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To skulk or sneak.
verb
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To loiter, loaf, or rove about.
verb
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To get food, money, etc. by begging or sponging.
verb
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To steal; pilfer.
verb
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To get by begging or sponging; cadge.
verb
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A person who sponges off others.
noun
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(UK) To wander around aimlessly, often causing irritation to others.
verb
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To beg, cadge, or sponge; to exploit or take advantage of others for personal gain.
verb
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(UK) To steal or filch.
verb
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One who mooches; a moocher.
noun
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Origin of mooch

  • Middle English mowchen probably from Old French muchier to hide, skulk

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English moochen, mouchen (“to pretend poverty"), from Old French muchier, mucier, mucer (“to skulk, hide, conceal"), from Old Frankish *mukjan (“to hide, conceal oneself"), from Proto-Germanic *mukjanÄ…, *mÅ«kōnÄ… (“to hide, ambush"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)mÅ«g-, *(s)mewgÊ°- (“swindler, thief"). Cognate with Old High German mÅ«hhōn (“to store, cache, plunder"), Middle High German muchen, mucken (“to hide, stash"), Middle English müchen, michen (“to rob, steal, pilfer"). More at mitch.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternate etymology derives mooch from Middle English mucchen (“to hoard, be stingy", literally “to hide coins in one's nightcap"), from mucche (“nightcap"), from Middle Dutch mutse (“cap, nightcap"), from Medieval Latin almucia (“nightcap"), of unknown origin. More at mutch, amice.

    From Wiktionary