Grub meaning

grŭb
To dig in the earth.

Grub for potatoes.

verb
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Food.
noun
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To dig; to dig up by the roots; to root out by digging; often followed by up.

To grub up trees, rushes, or sedge.

verb
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To dig up by or as if by the roots.

Grubbed carrots with a stick.

verb
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To clear of roots and stumps by digging.

Grubbed a small plot.

verb
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To obtain by importunity.

Grub a cigarette.

verb
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The thick wormlike larva of certain beetles and other insects.
noun
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A drudge.
noun
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To dig in the ground.
verb
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To work hard, esp. at something menial or tedious; drudge.
verb
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To search about; rummage.
verb
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To eat.
verb
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To clear (ground) of roots and stumps by digging them up.
verb
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To dig up by or as by the roots; root out; uproot.
verb
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The short, fat, wormlike larva of certain insects, esp. of a beetle.
noun
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A person who does menial or tedious work; drudge.
noun
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Food.
noun
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The thick wormlike larva of certain beetles and other insects.
noun
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(GRand Unified Bootloader) A program that calls a Unix/Linux operating system into memory. Officially GNU GRUB, GRUB is a popular boot loader due to its flexibility and configuration capabilities, allowing changes to be made at boot time and support for boot images from the network. See GNU and boot loader.
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(countable) An immature stage in the life cycle of an insect; a larva.
noun
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(uncountable, slang) Food.
noun
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To scavenge or in some way scrounge, typically for food.
verb
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(slang) To supply with food.

verb
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The definition of grub is a stubby worm-shaped larva of some insects, or a slang term for food.

An example of grub is the stage of a beetle before it cocoons and turns into its beetle form.

noun
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Grub is defined as to dig, search through or work very hard.

An example of grub is digging and pulling weeds out of a garden bed.

verb
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Origin of grub

  • Middle English grubben from Old English grybban ghrebh-2 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From hypothetical Old English root *grubbian, from Proto-Germanic *grubb- (compare Old High German grubilōn (“to dig, search”), German grübeln (“to meditate, ponder”)), from Proto-Germanic *grub- (“to dig”). The noun sense of "larva" (c.1400) may derive from the notion of "digging insect" or from the possibly unrelated Middle English grub (“dwarfish fellow”). The slang sense of "food" is first recorded 1659, has been linked with birds eating grubs or with bub (“drink”)."
    From Wiktionary