Maggot definition

măgət
Frequency:
(slang) A despicable person.
noun
18
2
(archaic) An extravagant notion; a whim.
noun
13
2
A wormlike insect larva, as the legless larva of the housefly: often found in decaying matter.
noun
10
1
The legless, soft-bodied, wormlike larva of any of various dipteran flies, often found in decaying matter.
noun
10
2
The legless, soft-bodied, wormlike larva of any of various dipteran flies, often found in decaying matter.
noun
2
0
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(archaic) An odd notion; whim.
noun
2
1
A term of insult for a 'worthless' person, as if a bug.

Drop and give me fifty, maggot.

noun
1
0
A soft, legless larva of a fly or other dipterous insect, that often eats decomposing organic matter.
noun
1
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
maggot
Plural:
maggots

Origin of maggot

  • Middle English magot perhaps alteration of mathek, maddokk perhaps from Old English matha

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English magot, magotte, probably Anglo-Norman alteration of maddock (“worm", "maggot"), originally a diminutive form of a base represented by Old English maþa (Scots mathe), from common Germanic root *mathon-, from the Proto-Indo-European root *math-, which was used in insect names, equivalent to made +"Ž -ock. Near-cognates include Dutch made, German Made and Swedish mask. The use of maggot to mean a fanciful or whimsical thing derives from the folk belief that a whimsical or crotchety person had maggots in his or her brain.

    From Wiktionary