Comb meaning

kōm
Comb means to thoroughly search for something, or to untangle, clean or straighten using a thin toothed hair styling tool.

An example of to comb is searching an entire neighborhood for a lost dog.

An example of to comb is pulling a hair styling tool through a child's hair to remove lice, combing the lice out with a comb.

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The definition of a comb is a thin, toothed tool used to arrange, smooth, untangle or hold hair.

An example of a comb is what Danny Zuko from the movie Grease used to keep his hair looking good.

noun
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A comb is defined as a fleshy ridge or crest growing from the top of the head of some domestic or game birds.

An example of comb is the red tuft growing from a rooster's head.

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A honeycomb.
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To straighten and separate (wool or other fibers) using a comb.
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To search thoroughly; look through.

Combed the dresser drawers for a lost bracelet.

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To eliminate with or as with a comb.

Combed the snarls out of his hair.

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To roll and break. Used of waves.
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To make a thorough search.

Combed through the file for the contract.

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Combination.
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Combustion.
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A thin strip of hard rubber, plastic, metal, etc. with teeth, passed through the hair to arrange, untangle, or clean it, or set in the hair to hold it in place or as an ornament.
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Anything like a comb in form, function, or location.
  • A currycomb.
  • A fine-toothed implement or machine used to clean and straighten long fibers of wool, cotton, flax, etc.
  • A red, fleshy outgrowth on the top of the head, as of a rooster.
  • A thing like a rooster's comb in position or appearance, as the crest of a helmet.
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A honeycomb.
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To clean, straighten out, or arrange with a comb.
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To remove with or as with a comb; separate.
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To search thoroughly; look everywhere in.

To comb a house for a missing book.

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To roll over; break.
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Combination.
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Combining.
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A toothed implement for grooming the hair or (formerly) for keeping it in place.
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A machine used in separating choice cotton fibers from worsted cloth fibers.
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A fleshy growth on the top of the head of some birds and reptiles; crest.
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A structure of hexagon cells made by bees for storing honey; honeycomb.
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An old English measure of corn equal to the half quarter.
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The top part of a gun’s stock.
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The toothed plate at the top and bottom of an escalator that prevents objects getting trapped between the moving stairs and fixed landings.
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(music) The main body of a harmonica containing the air chambers and to which the reed plates are attached.
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A former, commonly cone-shaped, used in hat manufacturing for hardening soft fibre.
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A toothed tool used for chasing screws on work in a lathe; a chaser.
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The notched scale of a wire micrometer.
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The collector of an electrical machine, usually resembling a comb.
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One of a pair of peculiar organs on the base of the abdomen in scorpions.
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The curling crest of a wave; a comber.
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A toothed plate used for creating wells in agar gels for electrophoresis.
noun
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(especially of hair or fur) To groom with a toothed implement; chiefly with a comb.

I need to comb my hair before we leave the house.

verb
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To separate choice cotton fibers from worsted cloth fibers.
verb
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To search thoroughly as if raking over an area with a comb.

Police combed the field for evidence after the assault.

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(nautical, intransitive) To roll over, as the top or crest of a wave; to break with a white foam, as waves.
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(abbreviation) Combination.
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Origin of comb

  • Middle English from Old English gembh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English camb (“comb”), from Proto-Germanic *kambaz (“comb”) (compare Swedish/Dutch kam, German Kamm), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos (“tooth”), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰ- (“to pierce, gnaw through”) (compare Tocharian B keme, Lithuanian žam̃bas (“sharp edge”), Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ), Albanian dhëmb, Ancient Greek γομφίος (gomphíos, “backtooth, molar”), Sanskrit जम्भ (jambha)).

    From Wiktionary