Bury meaning

bĕrē
To bury is defined as to place in the ground, cover up or hide.

An example of bury is someone covering a friend with sand after they've fallen asleep on the beach.

verb
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To occupy (oneself) with deep concentration; absorb.

Buried myself in my studies.

verb
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(slang) To outdo or defeat by a large margin.

The team was buried in the first half by its crosstown rivals.

verb
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To put an end to; abandon.

Buried their quarrel and shook hands.

verb
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A borough of northwest England north-northwest of Manchester.
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To put (a dead body) into the earth, a tomb, or the sea, usually in a ceremonial manner; inter.
verb
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To put away, as from one's life, mind, etc.

To bury a feud.

verb
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To put (oneself) deeply into; plunge; immerse.

To bury oneself in one's work.

verb
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(place) City in Greater Manchester, NW England.
proper name
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To ritualistically inter in a grave or tomb.
verb
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To place in the ground.

Bury a bone; bury the embers.

verb
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(often figuratively) To hide or conceal as if by covering with earth or another substance.

She buried her face in the pillow; they buried us in paperwork.

verb
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(figuratively) To suppress and hide away in one's mind.

Secrets kept hidden; she hid her shame and put on a smiling face.

verb
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(figuratively) To put an end to; to abandon.

They buried their argument and shook hands.

verb
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(figuratively) To score a goal.
verb
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(slang) To kill or murder.
verb
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noun
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anagrams
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A metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England.
pronoun
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A placename suffix indicating a fortified place.
suffix
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bury the hatchet
  • To stop fighting; resolve a quarrel.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of bury

  • Middle English burien from Old English byrgan bhergh-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English burien, berien, from Old English byrġan, from Proto-Germanic *burgijaną (cf. Old Norse byrgja ‘to close’), from *berganą (“to protect, shelter”) (cf. Old English beorgan, West Frisian bergje ‘to keep’, German bergen ‘to save/rescue something’), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerĝʰ, *bʰr̥ĝʰ (cf. Albanian mburojë (“shield”), Lithuanian (Eastern) bir̃ginti ‘to save, spare’, Russian беречь (bereč') ‘to spare’, Ossetian æмбæрзын (æmbærzyn, “to cover”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English burh (“fortified place”)

    From Wiktionary

  • See borough.

    From Wiktionary