Ransom meaning

rănsəm
(now rare) To release after such payment.
verb
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To pay a price to set someone free from captivity or punishment.

To ransom prisoners from an enemy.

verb
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Ransom is defined as the act of holding someone or something hostage in order to get a demand met, or the money paid to get the item or person back.

An example of ransom is the money paid to a kidnapper to get a kidnapped child back.

noun
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(christianity) A redemption from sin and its consequences.
noun
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(christianity) To deliver from sin and its consequences.
verb
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The redeeming or release of a captive or of seized property by paying money or complying with other demands.
noun
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To deliver from sin; redeem.
verb
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To ransom is to obtain the release of someone or something that has been held hostage by paying a price.

An example of ransom is to regain custody of a child from a kidnapper by paying the money which the kidnapper has been demanding for the child's release.

verb
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The price thus paid or demanded.
noun
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Deliverance from sin; redemption.
noun
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To obtain the release of (a captive or property) by paying the demanded price.
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(person) 1888-1974; U.S. poet & critic.
proper name
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The money paid to secure the release of a person held captive, whether as a result of having been kidnapped or captured in some other way; the release of a captured person in exchange for money or other consideration. To gain the release of a captive by paying the price demanded; to hold a person captive and insist on payment as the condition of release.
verb
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Money paid for the freeing of a hostage.

They were held for two million dollars ransom.

They were held to ransom.

noun
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The release of a captive, or of captured property, by payment of a consideration.

Prisoners hopeless of ransom.

noun
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(historical, law, UK) A sum paid for the pardon of some great offence and the discharge of the offender; also, a fine paid in lieu of corporal punishment.

noun
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(14th century) To deliver, especially in context of sin or relevant penalties.
verb
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To exact a ransom for, or a payment on.

Such lands as he had rule of he ransomed them so grievously, and would tax the men two or three times in a year. "” Berners.

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Origin of ransom

  • Middle English ransome from Old French rançon from Latin redēmptiō redēmptiōn- a buying back redemption

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the Middle English ransoun, from the Old French rançon, from stem of Latin redemptio. (See redemption.) Entered English ca. the 13th century

    From Wiktionary