Bail meaning

bāl
Bail is removing water from something.

Taking water out of an overly full pool is an example of to bail.

verb
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The bail amount is often related to both the particular crime in question and to the perceived risk that the accused will flee before trial.
noun
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Bail is defined as a bucket used to remove water from a boat.

What a person would use while in a sinking boat which is filling with water is an example of a bail.

noun
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(chiefly british) A pole or bar used to confine or separate animals.
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Money, a bond, etc. deposited with the court to obtain the temporary release of an arrested person on the assurance that the person will obey the court's orders, as by appearing for trial.
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The definition of bail is money or valuable collateral that is placed on deposit with the court to ensure that the arrested person will return to court when their case goes to trial.
noun
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When a person’s own assets can’t meet bail, the accused may borrow the money from a bond company that specializes in paying the jail for people's release.

The $100,000 amount demanded by the court before a defendent can be released from jail until the trial is an example of bail.

noun
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To release (a person) for whom security has been paid.
verb
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An arch or hoop, such as one of those used to support the top of a covered wagon.
noun
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Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person's appearance for trial.
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Release from imprisonment provided by the payment of such money.
noun
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A person who provides this security.
noun
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To secure the release of by providing security.
verb
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(informal) To extricate from a difficult situation.

Always bailing you out of trouble.

verb
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To remove (water) from a boat by repeatedly filling a container and emptying it over the side.
verb
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To empty (a boat) of water by bailing.
verb
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To empty a boat of water by bailing.
verb
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To parachute from an aircraft; eject. Often used with out .

Bailed out of the damaged airplane at the last possible moment.

verb
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To abandon a project or enterprise. Often used with out .

The investors bailed out when it looked as though the company was going to be unprofitable.

verb
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A container used for emptying water from a boat.
noun
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The arched hooplike handle of a container, such as a pail.
noun
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A hinged bar on a typewriter that holds the paper against the platen.
noun
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The pivoting U-shaped part of a fishing reel that guides the line onto the spool during rewinding.
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A small loop, usually of metal, attached to a pendant to enable it to be strung on a necklace or bracelet.
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(sports) One of the two crossbars that form the top of a wicket used in the game of cricket.
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The release thus brought about.
noun
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The person or persons giving bail.
noun
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To deliver (goods) in trust for a special purpose.
verb
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To set (an arrested person) free on bail or have (an arrested person) set free by giving bail.
verb
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To help out of financial or other difficulty.
verb
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A bucket or scoop for dipping up water and removing it from a boat.
noun
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To remove water from (a boat) as with a bail.
verb
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To dip out (water, etc.) as with a bail.
verb
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A hoop-shaped support for holding up the cloth of a canopy, etc.
noun
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A hoop-shaped handle for a bucket, kettle, etc.
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A device on certain fishing rods for controlling the unwinding and rewinding of the line.
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A bar on a typewriter to hold the paper against the platen.
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(chiefly brit.) A bar or pole to keep animals separate in a barn.
noun
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(cricket) Either of two sticks laid across the three stumps to form a wicket.
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Security, such as cash, a bond, or property, pledged or given to a court by or on behalf of one accused of committing a crime, to obtain release from incarceration and to ensure the person’s future appearance in court when required during the criminal proceeding. See also preventive detention and recognizance. To obtain for oneself or another the release from incarceration by providing security to ensure the person’s future appearance at every stage in a criminal proceeding. To temporarily give possession of personal property to someone. See also bailment.
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Bail set in an amount greater than what is reasonable, in light of the seriousness of the alleged crime and the risk that the defendant might flee, to ensure the person’s appearance at every stage of a criminal proceeding. The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the setting of bail in excessive amounts.
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Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person's appearance for trial.
noun
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(law, UK) Release from imprisonment on payment of such money.
noun
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(law, UK) The person providing such payment.
noun
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A bucket or scoop used for removing water from a boat etc.
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To secure the release of an arrested person by providing bail.
verb
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(law) To release a person under such guarantee.
verb
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(law) To hand over personal property to be held temporarily by another as a bailment.

To bail cloth to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier.

verb
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(nautical) To remove (water) from a boat by scooping it out.

To bail water out of a boat.

verb
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(nautical) To remove water from (a boat) by scooping it out.

To bail a boat.

verb
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To set free; to deliver; to release.
verb
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(slang) To exit quickly.

With his engine in flames, the pilot had no choice but to bail.

verb
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(informal) To fail to meet a commitment.
verb
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A hoop, ring or handle (especially of a kettle or bucket).
noun
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A stall for a cow (other animal) (usually tethered with a semi-circular hoop).
noun
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A hinged bar as a restraint for animals, or on a typewriter.
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(chiefly Australia and New Zealand) A frame to restrain a cow during milking or feeding.
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A hoop, ring, or other object used to connect a pendant to a necklace.
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(cricket) One of the two wooden crosspieces that rest on top of the stumps to form a wicket.
noun
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(furniture) Normally curved handle suspended between sockets as a drawer pull. This may also be on a kettle or pail, as the wire bail handle shown in the drawing.
noun
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To secure the head of a cow during milking.
verb
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(rare) To confine.
verb
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(Australia, New Zealand) To secure (a cow) by placing its head in a bail for milking.
verb
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(Australia, New Zealand) To keep (a traveller) detained in order to rob them; to corner (a wild animal); loosely, to detain, hold up. (Usually with up.)
verb
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Bail means to help out of a financial or another difficulty.

The US government giving money to many financial institutions in 2008 was an example of bail out.

verb
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jump
  • To fail to appear in court and so forfeit one's bail.
idiom
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make bail
  • To secure enough money or property to pay the amount of one's bail.
idiom
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go bail for
  • to furnish bail for
idiom
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bail out
  • to parachute from an aircraft in an emergency
  • to flee a difficult or dangerous situation
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

make bail
go bail for

Origin of bail

  • Middle English custody from Old French from baillier to take charge of from Latin bāiulāre to carry a load from bāiulus carrier of a burden

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English baille bucket from Old French from Vulgar Latin bāiula water container from Latin bāiulāre to carry a load

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English beil perhaps from Old English bēgel or of Scandinavian origin bheug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French dialectal probably from Latin baculum stick bacillus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the Old French verb bailler (“to deliver or hand over”) and noun bail (“lease”), from Latin bāiulāre, present active infinitive of bāiulō (“carry or bear”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English beyl, from Old Norse beygla (“a bend, ring or hoop”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From a shortening of bail out, which from above.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French baillier.

    From Wiktionary