Lug meaning

lŭg
(scot.) An ear.
noun
6
0
(slang) A clumsy fool; a blockhead.
noun
4
0
Lug is defined as a heavy bolt used to fasten a wheel, or is slang for a big man.

An example of a lug is the bolt used to mount a tire.

A man who is helpful at lifting heavy things is an example of a lug.

noun
3
0
The ancient Celtic god of artisanship and warriors. He was said to be the father of Cuchulain.
noun
3
1
A lug nut.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
To pull or drag with short jerks.
verb
1
0
A box for shipping fruit or vegetables.
noun
1
0
A shallow box for shipping fruit or produce.
noun
1
0
A wood box used for transporting fruit or vegetables.
noun
1
0
The definition of lug is to carry or drag something heavy.

To carry a suitcase up the stairs is an example of lug.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
A handle or projection used as a hold or support.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A lugsail.
noun
0
0
A projecting part of a larger piece that helps to provide traction, as on a tire or the sole of a boot.
noun
0
0
A copper or brass fitting to which electrical wires can be soldered or otherwise connected.
noun
0
0
To drag or haul (an object) laboriously.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To cause (an engine, for example) to run poorly or hesitate.

If you drive too slowly in third gear, you'll lug the engine.

verb
0
0
To pull something with difficulty; tug.
verb
0
0
To move along by jerks or as if under a heavy burden.
verb
0
0
To run poorly or hesitate because of strain. Used of an engine.

The motor lugs on hills.

verb
0
0
To carry or drag laboriously (something heavy)

To lug a crate upstairs.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(informal) To bring or introduce with some effort, awkwardness, etc.

You needn't lug my name into your argument.

verb
0
0
(horse racing) To veer slightly from a direct course.

The favorite lugged in toward the rail.

verb
0
0
An earlike projection by which a thing is held or supported.
noun
0
0
A loop on the side of a harness through which the shaft passes.
noun
0
0
Any of the heavy bolts which extend out from an axle hub or a disc brake, used with a nut (lug nut) to mount a wheel.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any of a series of raised or projecting areas as on an automobile tire or the sole of a boot, for increasing traction.
noun
0
0
(slang) Money exacted for political purposes.
noun
0
0
(slang) A fellow, esp. a large, awkward fellow.
noun
0
0
(archaic) The act of lugging.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
(1) (Linux Users Group) A formal or informal organization of Linux users who gather together virtually or in person to exchange information and resources. Some groups maintain mailing lists and send out newsletters for their members. For more information and a list of international user links, visit www.linux.org/groups.
0
0
The act of hauling or dragging.

A hard lug.

noun
0
0
That which is hauled or dragged.

The pack is a heavy lug.

noun
0
0
Anything that moves slowly.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A lug nut.
noun
0
0
(electricity) A device for terminating an electrical conductor to facilitate the mechanical connection; to the conductor it may be crimped to form a cold weld, soldered or have pressure from a screw.
noun
0
0
A part of something which sticks out, used as a handle or support.
noun
0
0
A fool, a large man.
noun
0
0
(UK) An ear or ear lobe.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(slang) A request for money, as for political purposes.

They put the lug on him at the courthouse.

noun
0
0
(UK, dialect) A rod or pole.

noun
0
0
(UK, dialect) A measure of length equal to 16½ feet.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A lugsail.
noun
0
0
(harness) The leather loop or ear by which a shaft is held up.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
To haul or drag along (especially something heavy); to carry.

Why do you always lug around so many books?

verb
0
0
To run at too slow a speed.

When driving up a hill, choose a lower gear so you don't lug the engine.

verb
0
0
(nautical) To carry an excessive amount of sail for the conditions prevailing.
verb
0
0

Origin of lug

  • Middle English lugge earflap probably of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English luggen of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old Irish

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge). Noun is via Scots lugge, probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish and Norwegian lugg). Probably related to slug (“lazy, slow-moving"), which is from similar Scandinavian sources.

    From Wiktionary