Tug meaning

tŭg
To pull at vigorously or repeatedly.

Tugged the bell rope.

verb
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To pull something vigorously or repeatedly.

Tugged at the coat's zipper.

verb
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An instance of tugging; a strong or sudden pull.

Gave the leash a tug.

noun
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A rope, chain, or strap used in hauling, especially a harness trace.
noun
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(slang) An act of masturbation.

He had a quick tug to calm himself down before his date.

noun
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Tug is defined as to drag or pull hard.

An example of tug is a dog pulling on the knot in a rope which is being pulled in the opposite direction by someone.

verb
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A pulling force.

The tug of gravity.

noun
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A contest; a struggle.

A tug between loyalty and desire.

noun
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To exert great effort in pulling; pull hard; drag; haul.
verb
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To labor; toil; struggle.
verb
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To pull at with great force; strain at.
verb
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To drag; haul.
verb
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An act or instance of tugging; hard pull.
noun
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A great effort or strenuous contest.
noun
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A rope, chain, etc. used for tugging or pulling; esp., a trace of a harness.
noun
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noun
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To pull or drag with great effort.

The police officers tugged the drunkard out of the pub.

verb
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He lost his patience trying to undo his shoe-lace, but tugging it made the knot even tighter.

verb
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verb
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noun
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(nautical) A tugboat.
noun
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Tug is short for tugboat which is a boat that is used for towing or pushing other water vehicles.

An example of a tug is the type of boat that would be used to tow a broken down battleship back to shore.

noun
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To move by pulling with great effort or exertion; drag.

Tugged the mattress onto the porch.

verb
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To tow by tugboat.
verb
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1

Origin of tug

  • Middle English tuggen from Old English tēon deuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English tuggen, toggen, from Old English togian (“to draw, drag"), from Proto-Germanic *tugōnÄ… (“to draw, tear"), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (“to pull"). Cognate with Middle Low German togen (“to draw"), Middle High German zogen (“to pull, tear off"), Icelandic toga (“to pull, draw"). Related to tee, tow.

    From Wiktionary