Bight definition

bīt
A loop or slack part in a rope.
noun
2
0
A loop in a rope.
noun
0
0
The middle or slack part of an extended rope.
noun
0
0
A bend or curve, especially in a shoreline.
noun
0
0
A wide bay formed by such a bend or curve.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(obs.) A bend, angle, or hollow, specif. of a body structure.
noun
0
0
A curve in a river, coastline, etc.
noun
0
0
A bay formed by such a curve.
noun
0
0
To fasten with a bight of rope.
verb
0
0
A long, gradual bend or curve in a shoreline. A bight can be larger than a bay, or it can be a segment of a bay.
0
0
Advertisement
A corner, bend, or angle; a hollow; as, the bight of a horse's knee; the bight of an elbow.
noun
0
0
An area of sea lying between two promontories; larger than a bay, wider than a gulf.
noun
0
0
A curve in a rope.
noun
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
bight
Plural:
bights

Origin of bight

  • Middle English bend, angle from Old English byht bheug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bight, biȝt, byȝt (also bought, bowght, bouȝt, see bought), from Old English byht (“bend, angle, corner; bay, bight”), from Proto-Germanic *buhtiz (“bend, curve”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (“to bend”). Cognate with Scots bicht (“bight”), Dutch bocht (“bend, curve”), Low German bucht (“bend, bay”), German Bucht (“bay, bight”), Danish bugt (“bay”), Icelandic bugða (“curve”), Albanian butë (“soft, flabby”) . Compare bought.

    From Wiktionary