Cove meaning

kōv
The definition of a cove is a sheltered or covered area such as a bay or a nook in cliffs.

An example of a cove is a small area on the beach shielded by rocks.

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A fellow; a man.
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A narrow gap or pass between hills or woods.
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A strip of open land extending into the woods.
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A small sheltered bay in the shoreline of a sea, river, or lake.
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A sheltered nook or recess, as in cliffs.
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(now rare) A hollow in a rock; a cave or cavern. [from 9th c.]
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(architecture) A concave vault or archway, especially the arch of a ceiling. [from 16th c.]
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A small coastal inlet, especially one having high cliffs protecting vessels from prevailing winds. [from 16th c.]
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(US) A strip of prairie extending into woodland.
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(now dialectal) A recess or sheltered area on the slopes of a mountain. [from 19th c.]
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(nautical) The wooden roof of the stern gallery of an old sailing warship. [from 19th c.]
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(nautical) A thin line, sometimes gilded, along a yacht's strake below deck level. [from 19th c.]
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To make in an inward curving form.
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A small bay or inlet.
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A small valley or pass.
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To form in a cove; curve concavely.
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(brit., slang) A boy or man; chap; fellow.
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(architecture) To arch over; to build in a hollow concave form; to make in the form of a cove.
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(UK) A fellow; a man.
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(Australia) A friend; a mate.
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To brood, cover, over, or sit over, as birds their eggs.
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A town in Arkansas.
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A village in Hampshire, England.
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A city in Oregon.
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Any one of three villages in Scotland.
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A CDP in Utah.
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Cove is defined as to curve or form a curve.

An example of cove is to form a curved molding.

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Origin of cove

  • Middle English chamber, cave from Old English cofa

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Romani kova man

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English cofa, from Proto-Germanic *kubô. Cognate with German Koben, Swedish kofva.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare French couver, Italian covare. See covey.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Romani kodo (“this one, him”) .

    From Wiktionary