Contrary definition

kŏntrĕrē
Frequency:
Inclined to oppose or disagree stubbornly; perverse.
adjective
12
1
Opposite in nature, order, direction, etc.; altogether different.
adjective
6
0
(logic) A proposition related to another in such a way that if the latter is true, the former must be false, but if the latter is false, the former is not necessarily true.
noun
6
2
Adverse; unfavorable.

A contrary wind.

adjective
3
1
Contrary is defined as something that is opposite.

An example of contrary is Christianity and Athiesm.

noun
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Given to opposition; perverse; wayward.

A contrary disposition; a contrary child.

adjective
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Opposite in direction or position.

Our boat took a course contrary to theirs.

adjective
9
9
The definition of contrary is someone or something that is opposite to something else or is unfavorable.

An example of contrary is two people having very different opinions about something.

adjective
0
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Given to recalcitrant behavior; willful or perverse.
adjective
0
0
Something that is opposite or contrary.
noun
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0
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In an opposite direction or manner; counter.

The judge ruled contrary to all precedent in the case.

adverb
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Opposed; in opposition.

Contrary to the rules.

adjective
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Unfavorable.

Contrary winds.

adjective
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The opposite; thing that is the opposite of another.
noun
0
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(logic) Either of two propositions so related that only one can be true but both may be false.
noun
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0
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In a contrary way; contrariwise.
adverb
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Opposite; in an opposite direction; in opposition; adverse.

Contrary winds.

adjective
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Opposed; contradictory; inconsistent.
adjective
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0
adverb
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noun
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One of a pair of propositions that cannot both be simultaneously true.
noun
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1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, I.47.

The Athenians having left the enemie in their owne land, for to pass into Sicilie, had very ill successe, and were much contraried by fortune [...].

verb
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1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12.

I finde them everie one in his turne to have reason, although they contrary one another.

verb
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(music) Moving in the opposite direction at a fixed interval.

Playing scales in contrary motion.

adjective
6
7
Opposed, as in character or purpose.

Contrary opinions; acts that are contrary to our code of ethics.

adjective
3
5
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Either of two opposing or contrary things.
noun
5
8
(obsolete) by contraries
  • In opposition to what is expected.
idiom
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0
on the contrary
  • In opposition to what has been stated or what is expected:
    I'm not sick; on the contrary, I'm in the peak of health.
idiom
0
0
to the contrary
  • To the opposite effect from what has been stated or what is expected:
    Despite what you say to the contrary, this contract is fair.
idiom
0
0
by contraries
  • contrary to what is expected
idiom
0
0
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on the contrary
  • as opposed to what has been said
idiom
0
0
to the contrary
  • to the opposite effect; in reversal of what is stated
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
contrary
Plural:
contraries

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

by contraries
to the contrary
by contraries
to the contrary

Origin of contrary

  • Middle English contrarie from Anglo-Norman from Latin contrārius contrā against kom in Indo-European roots -ārius -ary

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English contrarie, also contraire, from Old French contraire, from Latin contrarius (“opposite, opposed, contrary”), from contra (“against”).

    From Wiktionary