Sphere meaning

sfĭr
To sphere is defined as to enclose in or put into a round shape.

An example of to sphere is to create a paper mache Earth for a science demonstration.

verb
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The sky, appearing as a hemisphere to an observer.

The sphere of the heavens.

noun
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A spherical object or figure.
noun
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The definition of a sphere is a ball shape where the surface is the same distance from the center at all points or a level of society.

An example of a sphere is a globe.

An example of a sphere is the upper crust or those in the highest levels of society.

noun
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Designating some layer of the Earth.
suffix
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A celestial body, such as a planet or star.
noun
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A star, planet, etc.
noun
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Any of a series of concentric, transparent, revolving globes that together were once thought to contain the moon, sun, planets, and stars.
noun
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The visible heavens; sky.
noun
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Any of a series of hypothetical spherical shells, transparent, concentric, and postulated as revolving one within another, in which the stars, planets, sun, moon, etc. are supposedly set: a concept of ancient astronomy.
noun
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A place, range, or extent of knowledge, experience, influence, etc.
noun
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Social stratum; place in society; walk of life.
noun
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To put in or as in a sphere.
verb
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To put among the heavenly spheres.
verb
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To form into a sphere.
verb
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Something, esp. a cell or body part, resembling a sphere.

Oosphere.

affix
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Any of the atmospheric layers surrounding a planet or star.

Chromosphere.

affix
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A three-dimensional geometric surface having all of its points the same distance from a given point.
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(mathematics) A regular three-dimensional object in which every cross-section is a circle; the figure described by the revolution of a circle about its diameter [from 14th c.].
noun
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A spherical physical object; a globe or ball. [from 14th c.]
noun
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(astronomy, now rare) The apparent outer limit of space; the edge of the heavens, imagined as a hollow globe within which celestial bodies appear to be embedded. [from 14th c.]
noun
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(historical, astronomy, mythology) Any of the concentric hollow transparent globes formerly believed to rotate around the Earth, and which carried the heavenly bodies; there were originally believed to be eight, and later nine and ten; friction between them was thought to cause a harmonious sound (the music of the spheres). [from 14th c.]
noun
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(mythology) An area of activity for a planet; or by extension, an area of influence for a god, hero etc. [from 14th c.]
noun
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(figuratively) The region in which something or someone is active; one's province, domain. [from 17th c.]
noun
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(geometry) The set of all points in three-dimensional Euclidean space (n-dimensional space, in topology) that are a fixed distance from a fixed point [from 20th c.].
noun
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(logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.
noun
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To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to ensphere.
verb
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To make round or spherical; to perfect.

verb
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
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(mathematics) Used to form nouns indicating a sphere of x dimensions.

N-sphere.

suffix
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A three-dimensional surface, all points of which are equidistant from a fixed point.
noun
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To form into a sphere.
verb
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To put in or within a sphere.
verb
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Any round body or figure having the surface equally distant from the center at all points; globe; ball.
noun
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Origin of sphere

  • Middle English spere from Old French espere from Latin sphaera from Greek sphaira
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French sphere, from Late Latin sphÄ“ra, earlier Latin sphaera (“ball, globe, celestial sphere"), from Ancient Greek σφαῖρα (sphaira, “ball, globe"), of unknown origin. Compare Persian سپهر (sepehr, “sky")
    From Wiktionary