Field meaning

fēld
The definition of a field is a large open space, often where sports are played, or an area where there is a certain concentration of a resource.

An example of a field is the area at the park where kids play baseball.

An example of a field is an area where there is a large amount of oil.

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(physics) A region of space characterized by a physical property, such as gravitational or electromagnetic force or fluid pressure, having a determinable value at every point in the region.
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Growing, cultivated, or living in fields or open land.
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Working, operating, or active in the field.

Field representatives of a firm.

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The usually circular area in which the image is rendered by the lens system of an optical instrument.
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Made, used, or carried on in the field.

Field operations.

adjective
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To enter (data) into a field.
verb
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To play as a fielder.

How well can he field?

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A wide stretch of open land; plain.
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A piece of cleared land, set off or enclosed, for raising crops or pasturing livestock.
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A piece of land used for some particular purpose.

A landing field.

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An area of land producing some natural resource.

A gold field.

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Any wide, unbroken expanse.

A field of ice.

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An area of observation.

The field of vision of the human eyes, the field of view of a microscope.

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The background, as on a flag or coin.
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(heraldry) The surface or part of the surface of a shield.
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(horse racing) Those horses, in a race with more than twelve entrants, that are grouped together to function as a unit for betting purposes.
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(math.) A set of numbers or other algebraic elements for which arithmetic operations (except for division by zero) are defined in a consistent manner to yield another element of the set.
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(physics) A region, volume, or space where a specific, measurable force, as gravity or magnetism, exists.
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Of, operating in, or held on the field or fields.
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Growing in fields; having a field as its habitat.
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To position in a given location.

To field an army.

verb
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(baseball, etc.) To play as a fielder.
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(person) 1819-92; U.S. industrialist: promoted the first transatlantic cable.
proper name
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A distribution in a region of space of the strength and direction of a force, such as the electrostatic force near an electrically charged object, that would act on a body at any given point in that region.
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The region whose image is visible to the eye or accessible to an optical instrument.
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A set of elements having two operations, designated addition and multiplication, satisfying the conditions that multiplication is distributive over addition, that the set is a group under addition, and that the elements with the exception of the additive identity (0) form a group under multiplication. The set of all rational numbers is a field.
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A physical structure in a form, file or database that holds data. A field is one or more bytes in size. A collection of fields makes up a data record; for example, ORDER #, NAME, ADDRESS, CITY, etc. The terms field and "box" are often used synonymously such as a "search field" or "search box" on a Web page.The field is the common denominator for database searches. For example, the STATE field is referenced when the query to find "all customers who live in Florida" is made to a database. When totaling transactions, the ORDER_AMOUNT field is summed. JOB_TITLE is referenced when looking for certain employees.Fields, Data Elements and Data ItemsAlthough often used interchangeably, there are several terms that refer to the same unit of storage in a data record. A "data element" is the logical definition of the field, while a "data item" is the actual data stored in the field. For example, for each CITY data element defined in a record, there are many CITY fields (structures) in the database that hold the data items (New York, Chicago, Phoenix, etc.).
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Synonymous with data field. 1. A location or area in which certain data is located within a block or frame of transmitted data. See also block and frame. 2. A location or area in which certain data is located on a storage medium, particularly in a database record.
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​A land area free of woodland, cities, and towns; open country.

There are several species of wild flowers growing in this field.

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​A wide, open space that is usually used to grow crops or to hold farm animals.
  • Lord Byron (1788-1824)
    Fields which promise corn and wine.

There were some cows grazing in a field.

A crop circle was made in a corn field.

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The open country near or belonging to a town or city -- usually used in plural.
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​A physical phenomenon, such as force, potential, or fluid velocity, that pervades a region.

Magnetic field; gravitational field.

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​A course of study or domain of knowledge or practice.
  • 2013 May 10, Audrey Garric, “Urban canopies let nature bloom”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 22, page 30.
    As towns continue to grow, replanting vegetation has become a form of urban utopia and green roofs are spreading fast. Last year 1m square metres of plant-covered roofing was built in France, as much as in the US, and 10 times more than in Germany, the pioneer in this field.

He was an expert in the field of Chinese history.

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An area that can be seen at a given time.

Field of view.

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​A place where a battle is fought; a battlefield.
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​An area reserved for playing a game.

Soccer field.

Substitutes are only allowed onto the field after their boots are checked.

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A realm of practical, direct, or natural operation, contrasting with an office, classroom, or laboratory.

The design needs to be field-tested before we commit to manufacture.

Field work traditionally distinguishes true archaeologists from armchair archaeologists.

He needs some time in the field before his judgment can be trusted.

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​(algebra) A commutative ring with identity for which every nonzero element has a multiplicative inverse.

The set of rational numbers, is the prototypical field.

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​(geology) A region containing a particular mineral.

Oil field; gold field.

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​(heraldry) The background of the shield.
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​(computing) An area of memory or storage reserved for a particular value.
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A component of a database record in which a single unit of information is stored.
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A physical or virtual location for the input of information in the form of characters.

The form has fields for each element of the customer's home address and ship-to address.

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(baseball) The outfield.
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An unrestricted or favourable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement.
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All of the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or all except the favourites in the betting.

This racehorse is the strongest in a weak field.

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(sports) To intercept or catch (a ball) and play it.
verb
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(baseball, softball, cricket, and other batting sports) To be the team catching and throwing the ball, as opposed to hitting it.

The blue team are fielding first, while the reds are batting.

verb
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(sports) To place a team in (a game).

The away team fielded two new players and the second-choice goalkeeper.

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To answer; to address.

She will field questions immediately after her presentation.

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anagrams
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A surname​.
pronoun
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A range, area, or subject of human activity, interest, or knowledge.

Several fields of endeavor.

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(mathematics) A set of elements having two operations, designated addition and multiplication, satisfying the conditions that multiplication is distributive over addition, that the set is a group under addition, and that the elements with the exception of the additive identity form a group under multiplication.
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Any of the units of storage that are grouped to form a record.
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(person) 1850-95; U.S. writer.
proper name
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take the field
  • To begin or resume activity, as in a sport or military operations.
idiom
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keep the field
  • to continue activity, as in games or military operations
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play the field
  • to take a broad area of operations; not confine one's activities to one object
  • to date several people casually over a period of time
idiom
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take (or leave) the field
  • to begin (or withdraw from) activity in a game, military operation, etc.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take (<i>or</i> leave) the field

Origin of field

  • Middle English feld from Old English pelə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English field, feeld, feld, from Old English feld (“field; open or cultivated land, plain; battlefield”), from Proto-Germanic *felþuz, *felþaz, *felþą (“field”), from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (“field, plain”). Cognate with Scots feld, feild (“field”), North Frisian fjild (“field”), West Frisian fjild (“field”), Dutch veld (“field”), German Feld (“field”), Swedish fält (“field”). Related also to Old English folde (“earth, land, territory”), Old English folm (“palm of the hand”). More at fold.

    From Wiktionary