Parry meaning

păr'ē
To parry is to answer a question with an evasive reply, or to avoid an attack by using a countermove.

An example of parry is when a politician doesn't want to answer a question about his position on an issue so he gives an answer that sounds like he is answering but that doesn't really say anything at all.

An example of parry is when someone is trying to land a punch on a boxer and the boxer is able to block the punch and ends up throwing his opponent to the ground.

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The definition of a parry is a countermove that blocks your opponent or is an evasive answer.

A blocking move that a boxer does to stop a blow is an example of a parry.

When a politican is asked a question about a scandal and gives an answer that isn't really an answer, the answer is an example of a parry.

noun
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To deflect or ward off (a fencing thrust, for example).
verb
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To deflect, evade, or avoid.

He skillfully parried the question with a clever reply.

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To deflect or ward off a thrust or blow.
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The deflecting or warding off of a thrust or blow, as in fencing.
noun
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An evasive answer or action.
noun
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To ward off or deflect (a blow, the thrust of a sword, etc.)
verb
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To counter or ward off (criticism, a prying question, etc.) by a clever or evasive response.
verb
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To make a parry or evasion.
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A warding off or a turning aside of a blow, thrust, etc., as in fencing.
noun
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An evasion; evasive reply.
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1790-1855; Eng. naval officer & arctic explorer.
proper name
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A defensive or deflective action; an act of parrying.
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(fencing) A simple defensive action designed to deflect an attack, performed with the forte of the blade.
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To avoid, deflect, or ward off (an attack, a blow, an argument, etc.).
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Origin of parry

  • Probably from French parez imperative of parer to defend from Italian parare from Latin parāre to prepare perə-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From earlier parree, from Middle English *parree, *paree, from Old French paree (“preparation, ceremony, parade"), from Medieval Latin parāta (“preparation, parade"), from Medieval Latin parāre (“to ward off, guard, defend, prepare, get ready"). More at pare. The English verb to parry is taken from the noun.
    From Wiktionary
  • Alternative etymology derives the verb parry from French parez !, the imperative form of parer (“to fend off"), ultimately from the Medieval Latin parāre. See above.
    From Wiktionary
  • Anglicised from Welsh ap Harri, "son of Henry".
    From Wiktionary