Hedge definitions

hĕj
A row of closely planted shrubs or low-growing trees forming a fence or boundary.
noun
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Of, in, or near a hedge.
adjective
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A line of people or objects forming a barrier.

A hedge of spectators along the sidewalk.

noun
104
1
Low, disreputable, irregular, etc.
adjective
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2
An intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement.
noun
101
2
A row of closely planted shrubs, bushes, or trees forming a boundary or fence.
noun
101
3
A word or phrase, such as possibly or I think, that mitigates or weakens the certainty of a statement.
noun
98
1
Anything serving as a fence or barrier; restriction or defense.
noun
98
2
To enclose or bound with or as if with hedges.
verb
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The act or an instance of hedging.
noun
95
1
To hem in, hinder, or restrict with or as if with a hedge.
verb
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To hide or protect oneself, as if behind a hedge.
verb
92
3
To hide behind words; refuse to commit oneself or give a direct answer.
verb
89
0
To minimize or protect against the loss of by counterbalancing one transaction, such as a bet, against another.
verb
89
1
To try to avoid or lessen loss by making counterbalancing bets, investments, etc.
verb
86
1
To plant or cultivate hedges.
verb
86
2
To place a hedge around or along; border or bound with a hedge.
verb
83
0
To take compensatory measures so as to counterbalance possible loss.
verb
83
2
To hinder or guard as by surrounding with a barrier.
verb
80
1
To avoid making a clear, direct response or statement.
verb
80
2
To try to avoid or lessen loss in connection with (a bet, risk, etc.) by making counterbalancing bets, investments, etc.
verb
77
1
The definition of a hedge is a boundary or fence formed by closely planted bushes or trees.

An example of hedge is a line of bushes planted close together creating a border.

noun
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Hedge is defined as something you do to minimize loss.

An example of hedge is to buy the stocks of two competing companies so that you will receive an increase in the value of one stock even if the other stock declines in value.

verb
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A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.

He trims the hedge once a week.

noun
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(finance) Contract or arrangement reducing one's exposure to risk (for example the risk of price movements or interest rate movements).

The asset class acts as a hedge.

noun
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(UK, chiefly Devon and Cornish) A mound of earth, stone- or turf-faced, often topped with bushes, used as a fence between any two portions of land.
noun
5
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(UK, Ireland, noun adjunct) Used attributively, with figurative indication of a person's upbringing, or professional activities, taking place by the side of the road; third-rate.
noun
5
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A position created when a financial contract is purchased in the futures or options market. The purpose of the hedge is designed to protect against price changes in the actual commodity or financial instrument. By selling a futures contract, a producer or trader can protect against potential price declines. Buying a futures contract protects against rising costs. In essence, a hedge works somewhat like insurance.
4
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A non-committal or intentionally ambiguous statement.
noun
2
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To enclose with a hedge or hedges.

To hedge a field or garden.

verb
2
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A means of protection or defense, especially against financial loss.

A hedge against inflation.

noun
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A securities transaction that reduces the risk on an existing investment position.
noun
0
0
To obstruct with a hedge or hedges.
verb
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(finance) To offset the risk associated with.
verb
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(intransitive) To avoid verbal commitment.

He carefully hedged his statements with weasel words.

verb
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(intransitive) To construct or repair a hedge.
verb
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(intransitive, finance) To reduce one's exposure to risk.
verb
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Origin of hedge

From Middle English hegge, from Old English hecg, from Proto-Germanic *hagjō (compare Dutch heg, German Hecke), from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰyo-. More at haw.