Jurisdiction meaning

jo͝or'ĭs-dĭk'shən
Jurisdiction is defined as the power or authority to decide legal cases.

An example of jurisdiction is a court having control over legal decisions made about a certain group of towns.

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The territorial range of authority or control.
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The extent of authority or control.

A family matter beyond the school's jurisdiction.

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The right of a court to hear a particular case, based on the scope of its authority over the type of case and the parties to the case.
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Authority or control.

Islands under US jurisdiction; a bureau with jurisdiction over Native American affairs.

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The court’s authority over an individual who resides or is found within the court’s geographical area.
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The administering of justice; authority or legal power to hear and decide cases.
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Authority or power in general.
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A sphere of authority.
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The territorial range of authority.
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A law court or system of law courts.
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The power wielded by a government over its subjects, their property, and the land and natural resources within its boundaries.
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A court’s authority over persons or property brought before or appearing before it.
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The geographical area within which a government’s or a court’s power may be applied.
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The authority of a court to decide secondary or subsidiary claims raised by a case properly before it.
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An appeals court’s power of review of the decisions of lower courts.
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The overlapping jurisdiction of two or more courts over the same cause of action.
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The sole court or forum in which an action may be heard or tried, as no other courts or tribunals have authority over the person or the subject matter.
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The authority of the federal district courts to try cases that raise an issue of federal or constitutional law.
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The court’s authority to adjudicate rights in real or personal property located within the court’s geographical area.
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The minimum or maximum amount to invoke a particular court’s jurisdiction over the matter; in some lower courts, e.g., small claims court, there may be a limitation above which relief must be sought in a higher court; in federal court, a minimum amount in controversy is required in certain cases, e.g., diversity cases.
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Jurisdiction over only certain types of cases, or claims under certain financial limits or subject to other restrictions.
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A court’s status as the first court that has authority to hear a particular claim.
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A court’s authority over claims that would not ordinarily be brought before it, but that are secondary or subsidiary to claims properly before it.
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A court’s authority over particular types of cases or of relief.
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(legal term) Jurisdiction and power accorded to judges are intimately related. Power is constitutionally conferred on a judge to decide whether there has been a breach of law, the causes of the breach, and the kind of prison sentence or penalty that is appropriate for such a breach. The physical land area or geographical district within which a judge has jurisdiction is called his or her “territory.” Thus, a judge’s power relative to the territory is called “the territorial jurisdiction.” Judges have power only in their jurisdictions, and the decisions of judges in upper courts preside over decisions of judges in inferior courts. The ’Lectric Law Library. The ’Lectric Law Library’s Lexicon On Jurisdiction. [Online, 2004.] The ’Lectric Law Library Website: http://www.lectlaw.com/def/ j013.htm.
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The power, right, or authority to interpret and apply the law.
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The power or right to exercise authority.
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The authority of a sovereign power to govern or legislate.
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The limits or territory within which authority may be exercised.
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Origin of jurisdiction

Middle English jurisdiccioun from Old French juridicion from Latin iūrisdictiō iūrisdictiōn- iūris genitive of iūs law yewes- in Indo-European roots dictiō dictiōn- declaration (from dictus) (past participle of dīcere to say deik- in Indo-European roots)