Civil-law definition

The law of ancient Rome as embodied in the Justinian code, especially that which applied to private citizens.
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The body of law having to do with the private rights of individuals.
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The definition of civil law means the code of laws developed from the Romans and used today in Europe and the United States or any body of law in a nation or state, particularly having to do with individual rights.

An example of a civil law is one allowing everyone the freedom to own property.

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A system of law having its origin in Roman law, as opposed to common law or canon law.
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The body of law of a state or nation governing the behavior of individuals and corporations.
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The law determining private rights and liabilities, as opposed to criminal law and other public law.
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The body of codified law developed from Roman law and still in force in many European and American nations.
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The body of law that an individual nation or state has established for itself.
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A legal system derived from Roman law and based on fixed rules and statutes rather than on a court’s interpretation of broad principles. Prominent in continental Europe, Latin America, Scotland, Quebec, and Louisiana. See also common law and natural law.
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The law pertaining to civil or private rights and duties rather than to matters arising under administrative, criminal, or military law.
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(law) Roman law based on the Corpus Juris Civilis; it contrasts with common law.
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(law) The body of law dealing with the private relations between members of a community; it contrasts with criminal law, military law and ecclesiastical law.
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Attributive form of civil law.

Civil-law country.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
civil-law
Plural:
civil-laws