Scheme meaning

skēm
A secret or devious plan; a plot.

A scheme to defraud investors.

noun
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To make plans, especially secret or devious ones.
verb
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To contrive a plan or scheme for; plot.

Scheming their revenge.

verb
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An orderly plan or arrangement of related parts.

An irrigation scheme with dams, reservoirs, and channels.

noun
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A chart, diagram, or outline of a system or object.
noun
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An orderly combination of things on a definite plan; system.

A color scheme.

noun
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An outline or diagram showing different parts or elements of an object or system.
noun
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To plan in a deceitful way; plot.
verb
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(UK, chiefly Scotland) A council housing estate.
noun
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An analysis or summary in outline or tabular form.
noun
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An astrological diagram.
noun
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To make a scheme for; plan as a scheme; devise.
verb
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To make schemes; form plans.
verb
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To plot; intrigue.
verb
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A LISP dialect developed at MIT and Indiana University. TI developed a personal computer version of Scheme called "PC Scheme." See Script-Fu.
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noun
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noun
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noun
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A chart or diagram of a system or object.
noun
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(mathematics) A type of topological space.
noun
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(rhetoric) An artful deviation from the ordinary arrangement of words.
noun
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(astrology) A representation of the aspects of the celestial bodies for any moment or at a given event.
noun
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(intransitive) To plot, or contrive a plan.
verb
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A programming language, one of the two major dialects of Lisp.
pronoun
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The definition of a scheme is a plot or a plan to achieve some action.

An example of a scheme is a plot to defraud your boss.

noun
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To scheme is to plot or plan to do something.

An example of scheme is when you and your friend meet to talk about how you are going to get away with skipping school.

verb
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A systematic plan of action.
noun
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Origin of scheme

  • Latin schēma figure from Greek skhēma segh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Medieval Latin schÄ“ma (“figure, form"), from Ancient Greek σχῆμα (skhÄ“ma).

    From Wiktionary