Connive definition

kə-nīv
To feign ignorance of or fail to take measures against a wrong, thus implying tacit encouragement or consent.

The guards were suspected of conniving at the prisoner's escape.

verb
3
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To cooperate secretly in an illegal or wrongful action; collude.

The dealers connived with customs officials to bring in narcotics.

verb
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To connive is to cooperate secretly to do something wrong or illegal or to encourage wrong or illegal behavior.

When you create a secret plan to do something wrong with a friend, this is an example of connive.

verb
1
1
To scheme; plot.
verb
1
1
To cooperate secretly (with someone), esp. in wrongdoing; conspire.
verb
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To scheme in an underhanded way.
verb
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To cooperate with others secretly in order to commit a crime; to collude.
verb
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verb
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To pretend to be ignorant of something in order to escape blame; to ignore a fault deliberately.
verb
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(archaic) To open and close the eyes rapidly; to wink.
verb
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To be a wench.
verb
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To pretend not to see or look (at something wrong or evil), thus giving tacit consent or cooperation; feign ignorance of another's wrongdoing.
verb
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1

Origin of connive

  • Latin cōnīvēre, connīvēre to close the eyes

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Circa 1600, from French conniver, from Latin connīveō (“wink”), or directly from Latin, from com- (“together”) + base akin to nictō (“I wink”), from Proto-Indo-European *knei-gwh- (“to bend”). See also English nictate (“to wink”), from same Latin base.

    From Wiktionary

  • Sense comes from extension of “to wink” into “to wink (at a crime), to be privy”.

    From Wiktionary