Dog meaning

dôg, dŏg
A domesticated carnivorous mammal (Canis familiaris syn. Canis lupus subsp. familiaris) occurring as a wide variety of breeds, many of which are traditionally used for hunting, herding, drawing sleds, and other tasks, and are kept as pets.
noun
28
4
To hold or fasten with a mechanical device.
verb
18
9
(informal) A person.

Lucky dog.

noun
18
17
To track or trail persistently.
verb
17
9
Totally; completely. Often used in combination.

Dog-tired.

adverb
15
12
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Designating a family (Canidae) of meat-eating animals that includes dogs, foxes, wolves, coyotes, and jackals.
adjective
7
2
(slang) Feet.
noun
6
7
A male dog, wolf or fox, as opposed to a bitch (often attributive).
noun
5
2
Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae, such as the dingo.
noun
3
1
Any of various other animals, such as the prairie dog.
noun
2
1
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The definition of a dog is a four-legged animal that is often kept as a pet or used for hunting.

An example of a dog is a beagle.

noun
2
2
A domesticated carnivorous mammal (Canis familiaris syn. Canis lupus subsp. familiaris) occurring as a wide variety of breeds, many of which are traditionally used for hunting, herding, drawing sleds, and other tasks, and are kept as pets.
noun
2
2
Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae, such as the dingo.
noun
2
2
The male of a canine.
noun
2
2
A prairie dog, dogfish, or other animal thought to resemble a dog.
noun
2
2
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noun
2
2
(mech.) Any of several devices for holding or grappling.
noun
2
2
A male animal of the family Canidae, especially of a fox or a domesticated breed.
noun
2
2
(slang) The feet.
noun
1
0
(slang) A hot dog; a wiener.
noun
1
0
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(astronomy) A sundog.
noun
1
0
To follow, hunt, or track down doggedly.
verb
1
1
To hold or secure with a mechanical dog.
verb
1
1
A mammal, Canis lupus familiaris, that has been domesticated for thousands of years, of highly variable appearance due to human breeding.

The dog barked all night long.

noun
1
1
(derogatory) A dull, unattractive girl or woman.

She’s a real dog.

noun
1
1
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(slang) A man.

You lucky dog! He's a sly dog.

noun
1
1
(slang, derogatory) A coward.

Come back and fight, you dogs!

noun
1
1
(derogatory) Someone who is morally reprehensible.

You dirty dog.

noun
1
1
Any of various mechanical devices for holding, gripping, or fastening something, particularly with a tooth-like projection.
noun
1
1
A click or pallet adapted to engage the teeth of a ratchet-wheel, to restrain the back action; a click or pawl. (See also: ratchet, windlass)
noun
1
1
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A metal support for logs in a fireplace.

The dogs were too hot to touch.

noun
0
1
A hot dog.
noun
0
1
(poker slang) Underdog.
noun
0
1
(slang, almost always in the plural) Feet.

"My dogs are barking!" meaning "My feet hurt!"

noun
0
1
To pursue with the intent to catch.
verb
0
1
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To follow in an annoying way, to constantly be affected by.

The woman cursed him so that trouble would dog his every step.

verb
0
1
(nautical) To fasten a hatch securely.

It is very important to dog down these hatches...

verb
0
1
(intransitive, emerging usage in UK) To watch, or participate, in sexual activity in a public place, on the pretence of walking the dog; see also dogging.

I admit that I like to dog at my local country park.

verb
0
1
(intransitive) To intentionally restrict one's productivity as employee; to work at the slowest rate that goes unpunished.

A surprise inspection of the night shift found that some workers were dogging it.

verb
0
1
(intransitive, with up) To position oneself on all fours, after the manner of a dog.

I'd ask why you're dogged up in the middle of the room, but I probably don't want to know...

verb
0
1
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acronym
0
1
Digitally Originated Graphic.
acronym
0
1
A male animal of the family Canidae, especially of a fox or a domesticated breed.
noun
0
2
Any of various other animals, such as the prairie dog.
noun
0
2
Any of various hooked or U-shaped metallic devices used for gripping or holding heavy objects.
noun
0
2
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A mean, contemptible fellow.
noun
0
2
An andiron; firedog.
noun
0
2
Very; completely.

Dog-tired.

adverb
0
2
(slang) dog it
  • To fail to expend the effort needed to do or accomplish something.
idiom
0
0
go to the dogs
  • To go to ruin; degenerate.
idiom
0
0
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(informal) put on the dog
  • To make an ostentatious display of elegance, wealth, or culture.
idiom
0
0
a dog's age
  • a long time
idiom
0
0
a dog's life
  • a wretched existence
idiom
0
0
dog in the manger
  • a person who keeps others from having or enjoying something which that person either has but cannot use and may not want or does want but cannot have
idiom
0
0
dog it
  • to fail to exert the maximum or expected effort
idiom
0
0
every dog has his day
  • something good or lucky happens to everyone at one time or another
idiom
0
0
go to the dogs
  • to deteriorate; degenerate
idiom
0
0
let sleeping dogs lie
  • to let well enough alone; not disturb things as they are for fear of something worse
idiom
0
0
put on the dog
  • to make a show of being very elegant, wealthy, etc.
idiom
0
0
teach an old dog new tricks
  • to induce a person of settled habits to adopt new methods or ideas
idiom
0
0
the Greater Dog
  • the constellation Canis Major
idiom
1
0
the Lesser Dog
  • the constellation Canis Minor
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of dog

  • Middle English dogge from Old English docga

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dogge, from Old English docga (“hound, powerful breed of dog”), a pet-form diminutive of Old English *docce (“muscle”) (found in compound fingerdocce (“finger-muscle”) with suffix -ga (compare frocga (“frog”), picga (“pig”)). Cognate with Scots dug (“dog”). The true origin is unknown, but one possibility is from Proto-Germanic *dukkǭ (“power, strength, muscle”), though this may just be confusion with dock. In the 16th century, it superseded Old English hund and was adopted by several continental European languages.

    From Wiktionary