Pug meaning

pŭg
A dog of a small sturdy breed developed in China, having a short muzzle, wrinkled face, short smooth coat, and tightly curled tail.
noun
4
0
A pug nose.
noun
3
1
A fighter, especially a boxer.
noun
3
2
To make soundproof by covering or packing with clay, mortar, sawdust, or felt.
verb
1
0
A footprint, track, or trail, especially of an animal; a pugmark.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
Any of a breed of small, short-haired dog with a thickset body, square muzzle, deeply wrinkled forehead, and curled tail.
noun
1
0
noun
1
0
To temper (clay) for making bricks, earthenware, etc.
verb
1
0
To fill in with clay, mortar, sand, etc. for soundproofing.
verb
1
0
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A footprint or trail (of an animal)
noun
1
0
To trail by following footprints.
verb
1
0
Term of endearment (probably related to puck). [from the 16th c]
noun
1
0
A bargeman. [from the 16th c]
noun
1
0
A harlot; a prostitute. [circa 1600]

noun
1
0
Advertisement
A small dog of an ancient breed originating in China, having a snub nose, wrinkled face, squarish body, short smooth hair, and curled tail. [from the 18th c]
noun
1
0
An upper servant in a great house. [from the 19th c]
noun
1
0
The footprint of an animal. (Also pugmark) (From the Hindi for 'foot', related to Sanskrit 'padh' and Greek 'ped')
noun
1
0
Any compressed clay-like material mixed and worked into a soft, plastic condition for making bricks, pottery or for paving. (Also pug soil)
noun
1
0
A pug mill.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
Clay ground and kneaded with water into a plastic consistency for forming bricks or pottery.
noun
1
1
A machine for grinding and mixing clay.
noun
1
1
To work or knead (clay) with water.
verb
1
1
To fill in with clay or mortar.
verb
1
1
Any geometrid moth of the genus Eupithecia.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To mix and stir when wet.

To pug clay for bricks or pottery.

verb
0
0
To fill or stop with clay by tamping; to fill in or spread with mortar, as a floor or partition, for the purpose of deadening sound.
verb
0
0

Origin of pug

  • Hindi pag probably from Sanskrit padakam footstep, foot from padam ped- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for pugilist boxer

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • For the verb, compare German pucken (“to thump, beat").

    From Wiktionary