Heel meaning

hēl
Frequency:
The definition of a heel is the part of the foot on the opposite end from the toes, under the ankle, or the part of a shoe that supports the heel.

An example of a heel is the back part of the foot.

An example of a heel is the part of the shoe that flamenco dancers hit against the floor to keep rhythm.

noun
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1
(informal) A despicable or unscrupulous person; cad.
noun
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To arm (a gamecock) with gaffs.
verb
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2
The lower or rearward part, as:
  • The part of the head of a golf club where it joins the shaft.
  • The end of a violin bow where the handle is located.
noun
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(botany) The basal end of a plant cutting or tuber used in propagation.
noun
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Oppression; tyranny.

Under the heel of Stalinism; the heel of an autocrat.

noun
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(informal) A dishonorable or unscrupulous person.
noun
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(slang) To furnish, especially with money.
verb
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To press or strike with the heel.

Heel a horse.

verb
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To follow at one's heels.

The dog won't heel.

verb
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To tilt or cause to tilt to one side.
verb
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A tilt, as of a boat, to one side.
noun
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The back part of the human foot, under the ankle and behind the instep.
noun
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The corresponding part of the hind foot of an animal.
noun
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Crushing oppressive or tyrannical power.

Under the heel of fascism.

noun
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Anything suggesting the human heel in location, shape, or function, as the end of a loaf of bread, a rind end of cheese, the part of the palm of the hand nearest the wrist, the part of the head of a golf club nearest the shaft, the lower end of a ship's mast, or a small quantity of liquor left in a bottle.
noun
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To furnish with a heel.
verb
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To follow closely at the rear of.
verb
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To touch, press, or drive forward with or as with the heel.
verb
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To equip (a gamecock) with metal spurs.
verb
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(golf) To hit (a ball) with the heel of the club.
verb
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To follow along at the heels of someone.
verb
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To move the heels rhythmically in dancing.
verb
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Used in commanding a dog to follow at one's heels.
interjection
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To lean or tilt to one side, as a ship or boat in a high wind.
verb
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To cause (a vessel) to heel.
verb
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The act or an instance of heeling.
noun
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The extent of this.
noun
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The rounded posterior portion of the human foot under and behind the ankle.
noun
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The corresponding part of the hind foot of other vertebrates.
noun
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A similar anatomical part, such as the fleshy rounded base of the human palm or the hind toe of a bird.
noun
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(anatomy) The rear part of the foot, where it joins the leg.
noun
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The part of a shoe's sole which supports the foot's heel.
noun
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The rear part of a sock or similar covering for the foot.
noun
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(firearms) The back upper part of the stock.
noun
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The last or lowest part of anything; as, the heel of a mast or the heel of a vessel.
noun
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(US, Ireland) A crust end-piece of a loaf of bread.
noun
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(US) The base of a bun sliced in half lengthwise.
noun
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noun
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(slang, professional wrestling) A wrestler whose on-ring persona embodies villainous or reprehensible traits. Contrast with babyface.
noun
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(card games) The cards set aside for later use in a patience or solitaire game.
noun
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Anything regarded as like a human heel in shape; a protuberance; a knob.
noun
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(architecture) The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter. Specifically, (US), the obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping.
noun
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(architecture) A cyma reversa; so called by workmen.

noun
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To follow at somebody's heels; to chase closely.
verb
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To add a heel to, or increase the size of the heel of (a shoe or boot).
verb
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To kick with the heel.
verb
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To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, etc.
verb
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To arm with a gaff, as a cock for fighting.
verb
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(intransitive) To incline to one side, to tilt (especially of ships).
verb
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The act of inclining or canting from a vertical position; a cant.

The ship gave a heel to port.

noun
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The heel is defined as the outside bottom of a shoe, opposite of where the toes would be inside of the shoe.

An example of a heel is the part of a shoe that can be made thicker to make a person appear taller.

noun
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1
One of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread.
noun
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1
down at the heel
  • With the heel worn down. Used of shoes.
  • Shabby or poor in appearance.
idiom
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lay by the heels
  • To put in fetters or shackles; imprison.
idiom
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on
  • Directly behind.
  • Immediately following.
idiom
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out at the heel
  • Having holes in one's socks or shoes.
  • Rundown; shabby; seedy.
idiom
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take to (one's) heels
  • To run away; flee.
idiom
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to heel
  • Close behind:
    The hound followed his master to heel.
  • Under discipline or control:
    The army swiftly brought the rebels to heel.
idiom
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1
at heel
  • close to someone's heels; just behind
idiom
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cool one's heels
  • to wait or be kept waiting for a considerable time
idiom
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(idiom) dig in one's heels
idiom
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down at the heel
  • with the heels of one's shoes in need of repair
  • shabby; seedy; run-down
idiom
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heel in
  • to cover (plant roots) temporarily with earth in preparation for planting
idiom
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kick up one's heels
  • to be lively or merry; have fun
idiom
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on the heels of
  • close behind; immediately following
idiom
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out at the heel (or heels)
  • having holes in the heels of one's shoe(s) or sock(s)
  • shabby; seedy; run-down
idiom
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show one's heels
  • to run away
idiom
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take to one's heels
  • to run away
idiom
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turn on one's heel
  • to turn around abruptly
idiom
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Origin of heel

  • Alteration of Middle English helden from Old English hieldan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English hēla

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hele, heel, from Old English hēla, from Proto-Germanic *hanhilaz (cf. North Frisian hael, Dutch hiel, Danish hæl, Swedish häl), diminutive of Proto-Germanic *hanhaz (“hock”). More at hock.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alteration of earlier heeld, from Middle English heelden, from Old English hyldan, hieldan (“to incline”), cognate with Old Norse hella (“to pour out”) (> Danish hælde (“lean, pour”)). More at hield.

    From Wiktionary