Tilt meaning

tĭlt
To cause to be advantageous to one party rather than another.

A development that tilted the balance of trade in their favor.

verb
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To forge with a tilt hammer.
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A combat, especially a verbal one; a debate.
noun
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A tilt hammer.
noun
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A canopy or an awning for a boat, wagon, or cart.
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To cover (a vehicle) with a canopy or an awning.
verb
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To cause to slope or slant; tip.
verb
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To forge or hammer with a tilt hammer.
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To direct (a discussion, policy, etc.) so as to favor a particular opinion or side.
verb
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To slope; incline; slant; tip.
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To dispute, argue, contend, attack, etc.
verb
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To have, or come to have, a bias or inclination in favor of a particular opinion or side in a dispute.
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A medieval contest in which two armed horsemen thrust with lances in an attempt to unseat each other; joust.
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Any spirited contest, contention, dispute, etc. between persons.
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A thrust or parry, as with a lance.
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The condition or angle of being tilted; slope or slant.
noun
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A leaning, bias, etc.
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A cloth covering or canopy of a boat, stall, cart, etc.
noun
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To furnish or cover with a tilt.
verb
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To slope or incline (something); to slant [1590]

Tilt the barrel to pour out its contents.

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(jousting) To charge (at someone) with a lance [1590]
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(intransitive) To be at an angle [1620]
verb
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To point or thrust a weapon at.

verb
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To point or thrust (a weapon).
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To forge (something) with a tilt hammer.

To tilt steel in order to render it more ductile.

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(poker) To play worse than usual (often as a result of previous bad luck).
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(photography) To move a camera vertically in a controlled way.
verb
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A slope or inclination (uncountable)
noun
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A jousting contest (countable) [1510]
noun
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A thrust, as with a lance.

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(photography) The controlled vertical movement of a camera, or a device to achieve this.
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An attempt at something, such as a tilt at public office.
noun
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Tilt hammer.
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A canvas covering for carts, boats, etc. [1450]
noun
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Any covering overhead; especially, a tent.

noun
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To cover with a tilt, or awning.
verb
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The definition of a tilt is a tip or a slope.

An example of a tilt is the condition of a cup on its side.

noun
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Tilt is defined as to tip or slope in one direction.

An example of to tilt is to turn one's head to the side.

verb
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To cause to slope, as by raising one end; incline.

Tilt a soup bowl; tilt a chair backward.

verb
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To slope; incline.

The field tilts toward the river.

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To have a preference, favor, or be inclined toward something.

She recently tilted toward vegetarianism.

verb
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To be advantageous to one side over another, as in a dispute.
verb
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The act of tilting or the condition of being tilted.
noun
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at full tilt
  • At full speed:.
    A tank moving at full tilt.
idiom
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on tilt
  • In a reckless manner, especially playing poker recklessly after experiencing bad or good luck.
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(at) full tilt
  • At full speed or with the greatest force or energy.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of tilt

  • Middle English tilten to cause to fall perhaps of Scandinavian origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English telte tent from Old English teld
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old English tyltan "to be unsteady"; Middle English tilte. Cognate with Icelandic tölt (“an ambling place"). The nominal sense of "a joust" appears around 1510, presumably derived from the barrier which separated the combatants, which suggests connection with tilt "covering". The modern transitive meaning is from 1590, the intransitive use appears 1620.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English telt, from Old English teld (“tent"), from Middle Low German telt, perhaps via or influenced by Danish telt. Cognates include German Zelt (“tent"), Old Norse tjald (“tent") (whence also archaic Danish tjæld (“tent")). More at teld.
    From Wiktionary