Argument meaning

ärgyə-mənt
Frequency:
The minor premise in a syllogism.
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A topic; theme.
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Argument is defined as a verbal exchange between people with opposite views.

An example of an argument is a fight over whether the Yankees or the Mets are the better team.

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A word, phrase, or clause in a semantic relation with a word or phrase and that helps complete the meaning of that word or phrase, such as a noun phrase that is the object of a verb. The clause that we go is an argument of the verb suggest in the sentence I suggest that we go.
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A value used to evaluate a procedure or subroutine.
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A short statement of subject matter, or a brief synopsis of a plot; summary.
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Proof or evidence.
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A reason or reasons offered for or against something.
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The offering of such reasons; reasoning.
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A discussion in which there is disagreement; dispute; debate.
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The reason or reasons offered for or against something.
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The formal oral or written presentation of such reasons intended to convince or persuade.
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At a trial, the final statement given by the parties or their attorneys to the judge or jury, before deliberation, in which they summarize the evidence and the applicable law, present their interpretation of the same, and ask that a judgment or verdict be reached in their or their clients’ favors.
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A party or his attorney’s oral presentation to a court stating the factual and legal reasons why the court should decide a legal issue or take particular action in their favor.
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The oral, and sometimes written, presentation of additional arguments to a court on a matter previously argued before the court, but on which no decision has yet been rendered, for the purpose of advising the court of some controlling appellate court decision or principle of law that was previously overlooked or of some misapprehension of facts. See also reconsideration and rehearing.
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(philosophy, logic) A series of propositions organized so that the final proposition is a conclusion which is intended to follow logically from the preceding propositions, which function as premises.
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(mathematics) The independent variable of a function.
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(astronomy) The quantity on which another quantity in a table depends.

The altitude is the argument of the refraction.

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The definition of an argument is a reason or reasons why you are for or against something.

An example of an argument is the statement that the death penalty is wrong because innocent people could be killed.

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In programming, a value that is passed between programs, subroutines or functions. Arguments are independent items, or variables, that contain data or codes. When an argument is used to customize a program for a user, it is typically called a "parameter." See argc.
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Matter for question; business in hand.
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The procedure by which such arguments from all parties are heard by the court.
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A verbal dispute; a quarrel.
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(programming) A value, or reference to a value, passed to a function.

Parameters are like labeled fillable blanks used to define a function whereas arguments are passed to a function when calling it, filling in those blanks.

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(programming) A parameter in a function definition; an actual parameter, as opposed to a formal parameter.
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(linguistics) Any of the phrases that bears a syntactic connection to the verb of a clause.
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The subject matter of a discourse, writing, or artistic representation; theme or topic; also, an abstract or summary, as of the contents of a book, chapter, poem.
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The section of an appellate or trial brief in which a party pre-sents its interpretation of the law.
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Origin of argument

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin argūmentum from arguere to make clear argue

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Latin argumentum (“proof, evidence, token, subject, contents”), from arguere (“to prove, argue”); see argue.

    From Wiktionary