Comet meaning

kŏmĭt
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A small, frozen mass of water, gas, rocks, and dust revolving around the sun in a parabolic or elliptical orbit: as it nears the sun it vaporizes, forming a coma and, usually, a long tail of ions that points away from the sun.
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(astronomy) A celestial body consisting mainly of ice, dust and gas in a (usually very eccentric) orbit around the Sun and having a "tail" of matter blown back from it by the solar wind as it approaches the Sun.
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A celestial phenomenon with the appearance given by the orbiting celestial body.
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A celestial body, observed only in that part of its orbit that is relatively close to the sun, having a head consisting of a solid nucleus surrounded by a nebulous coma up to 2.4 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) in diameter and an elongated curved vapor tail arising from the coma when sufficiently close to the sun. Comets are thought to consist chiefly of ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide, and water.
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The definition of a comet is a celestial body that moves around the sun, and as it goes near the sun it forms a vapor trail of dust and gas that streams after it.

An example of comet is Haley's.

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A celestial object that orbits the Sun along an elongated path. A comet that is not near the Sun consists only of a nucleus—a solid core of frozen water, frozen gases, and dust. When a comet comes close to the Sun, its nucleus heats up and releases a gaseous coma that surrounds the nucleus. A comet forms a tail when solar heat or wind forces dust or gas off its coma, with the tail always streaming away from the Sun. &diamf3; Short-period comets have orbital periods of less than 200 years and come from the region known as the Kuiper belt. Long-period comets have periods greater than 200 years and come from the Oort cloud.
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Origin of comet

  • Middle English comete from Old English comēta from Late Latin from Latin comētēs from Greek komētēs long-haired (star), comet from komē hair

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French comete (French: comète), from Latin cometes, from Ancient Greek κομήτης (komētēs, “longhaired”), referring to the tail of a comet, from κόμη (komē, “hair”).

    From Wiktionary