Dust meaning

dŭst
Fine, dry particles of matter.
noun
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Particles of matter regarded as the result of disintegration.

Fabric that had fallen to dust over the centuries.

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A debased or despised condition.
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Something of no worth.
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Confusion; agitation; commotion.

Won't go back in until the dust settles.

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To remove dust from by wiping, brushing, or beating.

Dust the furniture.

verb
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To sprinkle with a powdery substance.

Dusted the cookies with sugar; dust crops with fertilizer.

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To apply or strew in fine particles.

Dusted talcum powder on my feet.

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(baseball) To deliver a pitch so close to (the batter) as to make the batter back away.
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To clean by removing dust.
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To cover itself with dry soil or other particulate matter. Used of a bird.
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Powdery earth or other matter in bits fine enough to be easily suspended in air.
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A cloud of such matter.
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Confusion; turmoil.
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A humble or abject condition.
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Anything worthless.
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(brit.) Ashes, rubbish, etc.
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Pollen.
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(archaic) A particle.
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To sprinkle with dust or a fine powdery substance.

To dust crops with an insecticide.

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To sprinkle (powder, etc.) on something.
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To rid of dust, as by brushing, shaking, or wiping.
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(archaic) To make dusty.
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To remove dust, esp. from furniture, floors, etc.
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To bathe in dust.
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Fine, dry particles of matter.
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A cloud of fine, dry particles.
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(uncountable) Fine, dry particles of matter found in the air and covering the surface of objects, typically consisting of soil lifted up by the wind, pollen, hair, etc.
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(countable) The act of cleaning by dusting.
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The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
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The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of the human body.
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(figuratively) Something worthless.
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(figuratively) A low or mean condition.
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(slang, dated) Cash; money (in reference to gold dust).
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(mathematics) A totally disconnected set of points with a fractal structure.
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To remove dust from.

The cleaning lady needs a stool to dust the cupboard.

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(intransitive) To remove dust; to clean by removing dust.

Dusting always makes me cough.

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(intransitive) Of a bird, to cover itself in sand or dry, dusty earth.
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To spray or cover something with fine powder or liquid.

The mother dusted her baby's bum with talcum powder.

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(chiefly US slang) To leave; to rush off.
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To reduce to a fine powder; to levigate.

Template:rfduotek.

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Dust is defined as to sprinkle powdery substances onto something, or to remove powdery substances from something.

An example of dust is applying a light amount of powder to the face.

An example of dust is using a cloth to remove fine dirt from the top of frames hung on a wall.

verb
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The definition of dust is fine bits of dirt or other matter that hangs in the air and settles on surfaces.

An example of dust is the dirt that gathers on top of books sitting on a shelf.

noun
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A cloud of fine, dry particles.
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(chiefly british) Rubbish readied for disposal.
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in the dust
  • Far behind, as in a race or competition:
    A marketing strategy that left our competitors in the dust.
idiom
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make the dust fly
  • To go about a task with great energy and speed.
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bite the dust
  • to die, esp. in battle
  • to stop existing or functioning; fail, break, etc.
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dust off
  • to prepare to use
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leave in the dust
  • to surpass or outstrip readily
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lick the dust
  • to be servile; grovel: cf. Mic. 7:17
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make the dust fly
  • to act energetically
  • to move swiftly
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shake the dust off one's feet
  • to leave with disdain or contempt: cf. Matt. 10:14
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throw dust in someone's eyes
  • to mislead or deceive someone
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of dust

  • Middle English from Old English dūst

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dust, doust, from Old English dust, dūst (“dust, dried earth reduced to powder; other dry material reduced to powder”), from the fusion of Proto-Germanic *dustą (“dust”) and Proto-Germanic *dunstą (“mist, dust, evaporation”), both from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewes-, *dʰews-, *dʰwAn-, *dʰūw- (“to smoke, raise dust”). Cognate with Scots dust, dist (“dust”), Dutch duist (“pollen, dust”) and dons (“down, fuzz”), German Dust (“dust”) and Dunst (“haze”), Swedish dust (“dust”), Icelandic dust (“dust”), Latin fūmus (“smoke, steam”). Also related to Swedish dun (“down, fluff”), Icelandic dúnn (“down, fluff”). See down.

    From Wiktionary