Soot meaning

so͝ot, so͝ot
Soot is a black powdery dirt made from carbon that usually comes from burning organic matter.

Ashes and black powdery dirt left in the fireplace after you've had a wood-burning fire is an example of soot.

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The fine black particles, chiefly composed of carbon, produced by incomplete combustion of coal, oil, wood, or other fuels.
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A black substance consisting chiefly of carbon particles formed by the incomplete combustion of burning matter.
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To cover, soil, or treat with soot.
verb
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A black, powdery substance that consists mainly of carbon and is formed through the incomplete combustion of wood, coal, diesel oil, or other materials. Because it absorbs energy from sunlight rather than reflecting it, soot is believed to be a cause of global warming, especially when it settles on snow and ice, reducing their reflectivity. Soot particles in the air are a contributing factor in respiratory diseases.
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Fine black or dull brown particles of amorphous carbon and tar, produced by the incomplete combustion of coal, oil etc.
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To cover or dress with soot.

To soot land.

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Origin of soot

  • Middle English from Old English sōt sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English sōt, from Proto-Germanic *sōtÄ… (“soot"), a derivation of *sitjanÄ… (whence also English sit). Cognate with Old Norse sót, Old Dutch soet and Middle Low German sōt. Compare similar ō-grade formation from the Proto-Indo-European *sed- (“sit") in Old Irish suide (“soot") and Balto-Slavic: Lithuanian súodžiai (“soot"), and Proto-Slavic *sadja (“soot") (Russian са́жа (sáža), Polish and Slovak sadza, Bulgarian са́жда (sážda)).

    From Wiktionary