Crock meaning

krŏk
To give off soot or color.
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One that is worn-out, decrepit, or impaired; a wreck.
noun
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To become weak or disabled. Often used with up.
verb
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To disable; wreck. Often used with up.
verb
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An earthenware pot or jar.
noun
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Crock is defined as to make dirty or bleed dye.

An example of crock is to pour mud on a white linen.

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The definition of a crock is a pot made of earthenware, or a piece of earthenware, or is slang for something that is nonsense.

An example of a crock is a pot in which beans are baked.

An example of a crock is a broken piece of clay.

An example of a crock is an absurd statement.

noun
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Foolish talk; nonsense.

That story is just a crock.

noun
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Soot.
noun
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To soil with or as if with crock.
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A broken piece of earthenware.
noun
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Something that is absurd, insincere, exaggerated, etc.; nonsense.
noun
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Soot; smut.
noun
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Coloring matter rubbed off from dyed fabric.
noun
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To soil with soot or smut.
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To give off coloring matter.
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An old broken-down horse.
noun
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Anyone or anything worthless, useless, or worn-out, as from old age.
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A medical patient who complains chronically about minor or imaginary illnesses.
noun
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To make or become disabled; break down; collapse.
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A piece of broken pottery, a shard.
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(UK) A person who is physically limited by age, illness or injury.

Old crocks’ home = home for the aged.

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(UK) An old or broken-down vehicle (formerly a horse).

Old crocks race = veteran car rally.

noun
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(slang, countable and uncountable) Silly talk, a foolish belief, a poor excuse, nonsense.

That is a bunch of crock.

The story is a crock.

noun
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A low stool.
noun
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To break something or injure someone.
  • 2006 April 30, The Sunday Times.

Thousands of cars crocked by dodgy fuel.

Ferreira ... peremptorily expunges England’s World Cup chances by crocking Wayne Rooney.

verb
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(textiles, leatherworking) To transfer coloring through abrasion from one item to another.
  • 2002, Sandy Scrivano, Sewing With Leather & Suede , ISBN 1579902731, page 95.

Colored fabrics should be dried separately for the first few times to prevent crocking (rubbing off of dye).

In leather garments, lining also prevents crocking of color onto skin or garments worn underneath.

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(horticulture) To cover the drain holes of a planter with stones or similar material, in order to ensure proper drainage.
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To store (butter, etc.) in a crock.

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The loose black particles collected from combustion, as on pots and kettles, or in a chimney; soot; smut.
noun
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Colouring matter that rubs off from cloth.
noun
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(intransitive) To give off crock or smut.
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Origin of crock

  • Earlier old ewe that has ceased bearing probably akin to Norwegian krake sickly animal and Middle Dutch kraecke broken-down horse
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English crokke from Old English crocc Sense 2, short for crock of shit
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English crokke, from Old English crocc, crocca (“crock, pot, vessel”), from Proto-Germanic *krukkō, *krukkô (“vessel”), from Proto-Indo-European *k(')rōug(')-, *k(')rōuk(')- (“vessel”). Cognate with Dutch kruik (“jar, jug”), German Krug (“jug”), Danish krukke (“jar”), Icelandic krukka (“pot, jar”), Old English crōg, crōh (“crock, pitcher, vessel”). See also cruse.
    From Wiktionary
  • Compare Welsh croeg (“cover”), Scots crochit, covered.
    From Wiktionary