Soil meaning

soil
Frequency:
The top layer of the earth's surface in which plants can grow, consisting of rock and mineral particles mixed with decayed organic matter and having the capability of retaining water.
noun
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Soil is the ground or the surface of the Earth.

An example of soil is the dirt that plants grow in.

noun
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A particular kind of earth or ground.

Sandy soil.

noun
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A place or condition favorable to growth; a breeding ground.
noun
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Country; land.

Native soil.

noun
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4
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To disgrace; tarnish.

A reputation soiled by scandal.

verb
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1
To corrupt; defile.
verb
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1
To dirty with excrement.
verb
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To make dirty, particularly on the surface.
verb
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To become dirty, stained, or tarnished.
verb
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To corrupt or defile; sully.
verb
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A soiled spot; stain; smirch.
noun
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Manure used for fertilizing.
noun
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Excrement, sewage, refuse, etc.
noun
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A marshy or miry place to which a hunted boar resorts for refuge; hence, a wet place, stream, or tract of water, sought for by other game, as deer.
noun
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To soil is defined as to make something dirty.

An example of to soil is to spill mud all over a pair of new, white shorts.

verb
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The agricultural life.

A man of the soil.

noun
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Filth, sewage, or refuse.
noun
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To bring disgrace upon.
verb
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A soiling or being soiled.
noun
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To feed (livestock) on soilage.
verb
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To purge (livestock) by means of green food.
verb
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The loose top layer of the Earth's surface, consisting of rock and mineral particles mixed with decayed organic matter (humus), and capable of retaining water, providing nutrients for plants, and supporting a wide range of biotic communities. Soil is formed by a combination of depositional, chemical, and biological processes and plays an important role in the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic cycles. Soil types vary widely from one region to another, depending on the type of bedrock they overlie and the climate in which they form. In wet and humid regions, for example, soils tend to be thicker than they do in dry regions.
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(uncountable) A mixture of sand and organic material, used to support plant growth.
noun
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(uncountable) The unconsolidated mineral or organic material on the immediate surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
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(uncountable) The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that has been subjected to and shows effects of genetic and environmental factors of: climate (including water and temperature effects), and macro- and microorganisms, conditioned by relief, acting on parent material over a period of time. A product-soil differs from the material from which it is derived in many physical, chemical, biological, and morphological properties and characteristics.
noun
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Country or territory.

The refugees returned to their native soil.

noun
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That which soils or pollutes; a stain.
noun
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Dung; compost; manure.

Night soil.

noun
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To make dirty.
verb
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(intransitive) To become dirty or soiled.

Light colours soil sooner than dark ones.

verb
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(figuratively) To stain or mar, as with infamy or disgrace; to tarnish; to sully.

verb
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(reflexive) To dirty one's clothing by accidentally defecating while clothed.
verb
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To make invalid, to ruin.
verb
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To enrich with soil or muck; to manure.
verb
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(uncountable, euphemistic) Faeces or urine etc. when found on clothes.
noun
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(countable, medicine) A bag containing soiled items.
noun
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A wet or marshy place in which a boar or other such game seeks refuge when hunted.
noun
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To feed, as cattle or horses, in the barn or an enclosure, with fresh grass or green food cut for them, instead of sending them out to pasture; hence (such food having the effect of purging them), to purge by feeding on green food.

To soil a horse.

verb
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
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Manure, especially human excrement, used as fertilizer.
noun
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1
To feed (livestock) with soilage.
verb
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1
The surface layer of earth, supporting plant life.
noun
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1
Any place for growth or development.
noun
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1
Land; country; territory.

Native soil.

noun
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1
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Ground or earth.

Barren soil.

noun
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1
To make dirty, esp. on the surface.
verb
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1
To become soiled or dirty.
verb
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1
To smirch or stain.
verb
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2
the soil
  • life and work on a farm
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the soil

Origin of soil

  • Middle English soilen from Old French souiller from Vulgar Latin suculāre (from Late Latin suculus) (diminutive of Latin sūs pig sū- in Indo-European roots) or from souil wallow of a wild boar (from Latin solium seat, bathtub soil1)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman a piece of ground (influenced in meaning by Latin solum soil) from Latin solium seat sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English soilen, soulen, suylen (“to sully, make dirty"), partly from Old French soillier, souillier (“to soil, make dirty, wallow in mire"), from Old Frankish *sauljan, *sulljan (“to make dirty, soil"); partly from Old English solian, sylian (“to soil, make dirty"), from Proto-Germanic *sulwōnÄ…, *sulwijanÄ…, *saulijanÄ… (“to soil, make dirty"), from Proto-Indo-European *sÅ«l- (“thick liquid"). Cognate with Old Saxon sulian (“to soil, mire"), Middle Dutch soluwen, seulewen (“to soil, besmirch"), Old High German solagōn, bisullen (“to make dirty"), German dialectal sühlen (“to soil, make dirty"), Danish søle (“to make dirty, defile"), Swedish söla (“to soil, make dirty"), Gothic 𐌱𐌹𐍃𐌰𐌿𐌻𐌾𐌰𐌽 (bisauljan, “to bemire").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English soile, soyle, sule (“ground, earth"), partly from Anglo-Norman soyl (“bottom, ground, pavement"), from Latin solium (“seat, threshold, place"), mistaken for Latin solum (“ground, foundation, earth, sole of the foot"); and partly from Old English sol (“mud, mire, wet sand"), from Proto-Germanic *sulÄ… (“mud, spot"), from Proto-Indo-European *sÅ«l- (“thick liquid"). Cognate with Middle Low German söle (“dirt, mud"), Middle Dutch sol (“dirt, filth"), Middle High German sol, söl (“dirt, mud, mire"), Danish søle (“mud, muck"). See also sole, soal.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English soyl, from Old French soil, souil (“quagmire, marsh"), from Frankish *sōlja, *saulja (“mire, miry place, wallow"), from Proto-Germanic *sauljō (“mud, puddle, feces"), from Proto-Indo-European *sÅ«l- (“thick liquid"). Cognate with Old English syle, sylu, sylen (“miry place, wallow"), Old High German sol, gisol (“miry place"), German Suhle (“a wallow, mud pit, muddy pool").

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French saoler, saouler (“to satiate").

    From Wiktionary