Muck definitions

mŭk
Muck is mud, wet manure, or a black dirt made up of rotting plant material.

An example of muck is the sticky thick ground in a cow field after the rain.

An example of muck is fresh manure.

An example of muck is the thick mud that forms underneath a pile of leaves.

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A moist sticky mixture, especially of mud and filth.
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Moist farmyard dung; manure.
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Dark fertile soil containing decaying vegetable matter.
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Something filthy or disgusting.
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Earth, rocks, or clay excavated in mining.
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The pile of discarded cards, as in poker.

Threw his hand into the muck.

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To fertilize with manure or compost.
verb
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To make dirty, especially with muck.
verb
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To remove muck or dirt from (a mine, for example).
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To fold (one's hand) in a card game, especially by pushing one's cards away.
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To muck one's hand in a card game.
verb
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Moist manure.
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Black earth containing decaying matter, used as a fertilizer.
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Mire; mud.
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To fertilize with muck.
verb
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To dirty with or as with muck.
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To make a mess of; bungle.
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To clean (esp. a stable); remove muck from.
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See MUD.
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Slimy mud.

The car was covered in muck from the rally race.

I need to clean the muck off my shirt.

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Soft or slimy manure.

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Dirt; something that makes another thing dirty.

What's that green muck on the floor?

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Anything filthy or vile.

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To shovel muck.

We need to muck the stable before it gets too thick.

verb
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To manure with muck.
verb
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To do a dirty job.
verb
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(poker, colloquial) To pass (give one's cards back to the dealer).
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Anything unclean or degrading; dirt; filth.
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Origin of muck

From Middle English mok, muk, from Old Norse myki, mykr (“dung") (compare Icelandic mykja), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meug (“slick, slippery"), *meuk (compare Welsh mign (“swamp"), Latin mÅ«cus (“snot"), mucere (“to be moldy or musty"), Latvian mukls (“swampy"), Albanian myk (“mould"), Ancient Greek mýxa 'mucus, lamp wick', mýkes 'fungus'), from *(s)meug, meuk 'to slip'. More at meek.