Grease meaning

grēs
Soft or melted animal fat, especially after rendering.
noun
2
1
(slang) To kill, murder.

Fatcats who can't be greased by the mob's money are greased the hard way.

verb
1
0
A thick oil or viscous substance, especially when used as a lubricant.
noun
1
1
To facilitate the progress of.
verb
0
0
To kill.
verb
0
0
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Melted animal fat.
noun
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0
Any thick, oily substance or lubricant, esp. the substance that is put on the moving parts of automobiles and other machines to make them run smoothly.
noun
0
0
An inflammation of the skin of a horse's fetlock or pastern characterized by cracked skin and an oily discharge.
noun
0
0
To smear or lubricate with grease.
verb
0
0
To influence by giving money to; bribe or tip.
verb
0
0
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Animal fat in a melted or soft state.
noun
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0
(extension) Any oily or fatty matter.
noun
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Shorn but not yet cleansed wool.
noun
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0
Inflammation of a horse's heels, also known as scratches or pastern dermatitis.
noun
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0
To put grease or fat on something, especially in order to lubricate.
verb
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(informal) To bribe.
verb
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0
(slang, aviation) To perform a landing extraordinarily smoothly.

To my amazement, I greased the landing despite the tricky crosswinds.

verb
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Something, such as money or influence, that facilitates the attainment of an object or a desire.

Accepted some grease to fix the outcome of the race.

noun
0
1
To coat, smear, or soil with grease.

Greased the pie pan.

verb
0
1
To lubricate with grease.
verb
0
1
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grease (someone's) palm
  • To bribe.
idiom
0
0
in (the) grease
  • Fat and ready to be killed.
  • In an uncleaned condition.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of grease

  • Middle English grese from Anglo-Norman grece from Vulgar Latin crassia from Latin crassus fat, thick

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman grece, from Old French graisse, from Latin crassus (“fat, thick”).

    From Wiktionary