Carbon meaning

kärbən
The definition of carbon is a nonmetallic chemical element found in all natural element combinations and some man-made element combinations.

An example of carbon is the basic element found in coal.

An example of carbon is a basic matter found in dinosaur bones which is used to determine the age of the bone.

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An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4.
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A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect.

Plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.

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A stable isotope of carbon, having six protons and six neutrons in the nucleus. Carbon-12 makes up most naturally occurring carbon.
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A nonmetallic chemical element found in many inorganic compounds and all organic compounds: diamond and graphite are pure carbon; carbon is the basic element in coal, coke, charcoal, soot, etc.: symbol, C; at. no. 6: a radioactive isotope (carbon-14) is used as a tracer in chemical and biochemical research, and, because of its half-life of 5,730 years and its presence in all carbon-containing matter, it is a means of dating archaeological specimens, fossils, etc.
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(countable, informal) A sheet of carbon paper.
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A naturally occurring, radioactive carbon isotope with an atomic mass of 14 and a half-life of 5,730 years, used in determining the age of ancient organic, geologic, or archaeological specimens.
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A sheet of carbon paper.
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A stick of carbon used in an arc lamp.
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A carbon plate or rod used in a battery.
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Of, like, or treated with carbon.
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An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4.
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A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect.

Plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.

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A naturally abundant, nonmetallic element that occurs in all organic compounds and can be found in all known forms of life. Diamonds and graphite are pure forms, and carbon is a major constituent of coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Carbon generally forms four covalent bonds with other atoms in larger molecules. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point above 3,500°C; boiling point 4,827°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4.
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A stable isotope of carbon, having six protons and six neutrons in the nucleus. Carbon 12 makes up most naturally occurring carbon.
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A naturally occurring radioactive isotope of carbon having six protons and eight neutrons in the nucleus. Carbon 14 is important in dating archaeological and biological remains by radiocarbon dating .
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A programming interface from Apple that enabled developers to port their Mac OS 9 apps to OS X without having to recode in Cocoa. Carbon was eliminated in Mac OS X Version 10.8. See Cocoa.
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(uncountable) The chemical element (symbol C) with an atomic number of 6.
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(countable, informal) A carbon copy.
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A fossil fuel that is made of impure carbon such as coal or charcoal.
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(ecology, uncountable) Carbon dioxide, in the context of global warming and climate change.
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(physics) The most abundant of the two stable isotopes of carbon, 126C, having six protons and six neutrons; it is the standard for atomic weight and is used to define the mole.
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(physics) The least abundant of the two stable isotopes of carbon, 136C, having six protons and seven neutrons.
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(physics) A radioactive isotopes of carbon, 146C, having six protons and eight neutrons; it is used in radiocarbon dating.
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Origin of carbon

  • French carbone from Latin carbō carbōn- a coal, charcoal ker-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French carbone, coined by Lavoisier, from Latin carbō (“charcoal, coal”), from Proto-Indo-European *ker- (“to burn”), see also Old English heorþ (“hearth”), Old Norse hyrr (“fire”), Gothic (hauri, “coal”), Old High German harsta (“roasting”), Russian церен (ceren, “brazier”), Old Church Slavonic крада (krada, “hearth, fireplace”), Lithuanian kuriu (“to heat”), karstas (“hot”) and krosnis (“oven”), Sanskrit कृष्ण (kṛṣṇa, “burnt, black”) and कूडयति (kūḍayati, “singes”), Latin cremare (“to burn”).

    From Wiktionary