Graphite meaning

grăfīt
A grey colour.
noun
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A naturally occurring, steel-gray to black, crystalline form of carbon. The carbon atoms in graphite are strongly bonded together in sheets. Because the bonds between the sheets are weak, other atoms can easily fit between them, causing graphite to be soft and slippery to the touch. Graphite is used in pencils and paints and as a lubricant and electrode. It is also used to control chain reactions in nuclear reactors because of its ability to absorb neutrons.
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A soft crystalline allotrope of carbon, composed of graphene layers, having a steel-gray to black metallic luster and a greasy feel, used in lead pencils, lubricants, paints and coatings, and fabricated into a variety of forms such as molds, bricks, electrodes, crucibles, and rocket nozzles.
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A very soft, black, hexagonal mineral of pure carbon, formed in thin plates and found in metamorphic rocks: used in making electrodes, paints, the lead of pencils, etc.
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An allotrope of carbon consisting of planes of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal arrays with the planes stacked loosely that is used as a dry lubricant and in "lead" pencils.
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Short for graphite-reinforced plastic, a composite plastic made with graphite fibers noted for light weight strength and stiffness.

Modern tennis racquets are made of graphite, fibreglass and other man-made materials.

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Origin of graphite

  • Greek graphein to write gerbh- in Indo-European roots –ite

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From German Graphit (A.G. Werner 1789), from Ancient Greek γράφω (graphō, “I write”).

    From Wiktionary