Wood Definition

wo͝od
woods
noun
woods
The hard, fibrous substance beneath the bark in the stems and branches of trees and shrubs; xylem.
Webster's New World
This tissue when cut and dried, used especially for building material and fuel.
American Heritage
A thick growth of trees; forest or grove.
Webster's New World
Trees cut and prepared for use in making things; lumber or timber.
Webster's New World
A forest.
American Heritage
Synonyms:
Natalie WoodSir Henry Joseph WoodSir Henry WoodEllen Price WoodMrs. Henry Woodgrant woodwoodsforestwoodwindwoodwind-instrumentinsanexylemwealdunbalancedtrees
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verb
woods
To fuel with wood.
American Heritage
To plant or cover thickly with trees.
Webster's New World
To gather or be supplied with wood.
American Heritage
adjective
Made of wood; wooden.
Webster's New World
For cutting, shaping, or holding wood.
Webster's New World
Growing or living in woods.
Wood anemone, wood-grouse.
Webster's New World
Mentally deranged.
American Heritage
Out of one's mind; insane.
Webster's New World
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proper name
1892-1942; U.S. painter.
Webster's New World
1860-1927; U.S. general & political administrator.
Webster's New World
pronoun

An English topographic surname for someone who lived in or near a wood.

Wiktionary

An English occupational surname for a woodsman.

Wiktionary
idiom
out of the woods
  • Free of a difficult or hazardous situation; in a position of safety or security.
American Heritage
knock on wood
  • a phrase used, often accompanying the touching of something wooden, as after an optimistic statement so as not to tempt fate
Webster's New World
out of the woods
  • out of difficulty, danger, etc.
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Wood

Noun

Singular:
wood
Plural:
woods

Adjective

Base Form:
wood
Comparative:
wooder
Superlative:
woodest

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Wood

Origin of Wood

  • From Middle English wode, from Old English wudu, widu (“wood, forest, grove; tree; timber"), from Proto-Germanic *widuz (“wood"), from Proto-Indo-European *widÊ°u-. Cognate with Old High German witu, Old Norse viðr (Danish and Swedish ved).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old English wōd wet-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Old English wōd. See the full etymology at wode.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English wode from Old English wudu

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Back-formation from peckerwood.

    From Wiktionary

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