Satellite meaning

sătl-īt
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The definition of a satellite is a natural body revolving around a planet, a branch of a larger company, country, etc. that is located way from the main part or a device used to orbit in space.

An example of satellite is the moon.

An example of satellite is a smaller writing center located a few buildings away from the main one.

An example of satellite is Sputnik I.

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An object launched to orbit Earth or another celestial body, as a device for reflecting or relaying radio signals or for capturing images.
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A nation dominated politically and economically by another nation.
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(astronomy) A celestial body, such as a moon, planet, comet, or other solar system body, that orbits a larger body.
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A small unit in a system or organization that is managed or controlled by a larger, often centrally located unit.
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An object launched to orbit Earth or another celestial body. Satellites are used for research, communications, weather information, and navigation. The first artificial Earth satellite was Sputnik 1, launched by the Soviet Union in October 1957; the first successful American satellite was launched in January 1958.
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An urban or suburban community located near a big city.
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(genetics) A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
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(microbiology) A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
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Of, relating to, or being a satellite.
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Of or relating to the transmission of electromagnetic signals by communications satellite.

Satellite broadcasting; satellite phone.

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Something subordinate or dependent; specif., a small state that is economically or politically dependent on, and hence adjusts its policies to, a larger, more powerful state.
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(genetics) A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
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(microbiology) A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
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A small body in orbit around a larger body.
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From the Latin satelles, meaning attendant. 1. A attendant celestial body that revolves or is intended to revolve around a larger celestial body. For example, a planet orbits a sun and a moon orbits a planet. The Earth's moon orbits the Earth. Actually, that's not quite true. The moon and the Earth orbit each other as they both revolve around their common center of gravity. As the Earth is the larger of the two and, therefore, exerts more gravitational force, the moon does most of the revolving. 2. A manmade object that orbits the Earth or some other celestial body. Satellites in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) are placed in orbital slots such that they maintain their positions relative to the Earth's surface. Medium Earth Orbiting (MEO) and Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites do not. See also GEO, LEO, and MEO.
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A moon or other smaller body orbiting a larger one. [from 17th c.]

The Moon is a natural satellite of the Earth.

A spent upper stage is a derelict satellite.

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A man-made apparatus designed to be placed in orbit around a celestial body, generally to relay information, data etc. to Earth. [from 20th c.]

Many telecommunication satellites orbit at 36000km above the equator.

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A country, state, office, building etc. which is under the jurisdiction, influence, or domination of another body. [from 19th c.]
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(now rare) An attendant on an important person; a member of someone's retinue, often in a somewhat derogatory sense; a henchman. [from 16th c.]
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(colloquial, uncountable) Satellite TV; reception of television broadcasts via services that utilize man-made satellite technology. [from 20th c.]

Do you have satellite at your house?

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Origin of satellite

  • French hanger-on, hireling from Old French from Latin satelles satellit-

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French satellite, from Latin satelles (“attendant"). Ultimately perhaps of Etruscan origin.

    From Wiktionary