Circus meaning

sûrkəs
(chiefly british) An open circular place where several streets intersect.
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(informal) Something suggestive of a circus, as in frenetic activity or noisy disorder.
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In ancient Rome, an oval or oblong arena with tiers of seats around it, used as for games or chariot races.
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A similar arena, often enclosed in a tent or building for performances by acrobats, trained animals, clowns, etc.
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The performance of such a show.
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A round open space in a town or city where multiple streets meet.

Oxford Circus in London is at the north end of Regent Street.

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A traveling show of this sort or its personnel, equipment, etc.
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(informal) Anything thought of as being like a circus, as an event, place, or activity that is riotously entertaining, spectacular, frenzied, disorganized, etc.

A media circus.

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A traveling company of performers that may include acrobats, clowns, trained animals, and other novelty acts, that gives shows usually in a circular tent.

The circus will be in town next week.

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A roofless oval enclosure surrounded by tiers of seats that was used in antiquity for public spectacles.
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(brit.) A circular open place where many streets come together.
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(historical) In the ancient Roman Empire, a building for chariot racing.
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(military, World War II) A code name for bomber attacks with fighter escorts in the day time. The attacks were against short-range targets with the intention of occupying enemy fighters and keeping their fighter units in the area concerned.
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A taxonomic genus within the subfamily Circinae — the harriers.
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Origin of circus

  • Middle English round arena from Latin circus, circle circle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin circus (“ring, circle”), from Proto-Indo-European *sker, *ker (“to turn, to bend”) .

    From Wiktionary